2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/97900
Title:
Bone status in professional cyclists
Authors:
Campion, F.; Nevill, Alan M.; Karlsson, M. K.; Lounana, J.; Shabani, M.; Fardellone, P.; Medelli, J.
Abstract:
Professional cycling combines extensive endurance training with non weight-bearing exercise, two factors often associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD). Therefore BMD was measured with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry in 30 professional road cyclists (mean (SD) age: 29.1 (3.4) years; height: 178.5 (6.7) cm; weight: 71.3 (6.1) kg; %fat mass: 9.7 (3.2)%; V˙O2max: 70.5 (5.5) ml·kg−1·min−1) and in 30 young healthy males used as reference (28.6 (4.5) years; 176.5 (6.3) cm; 73.4 (7.3) kg; 20.7 (5.8)%). Adjusting for differences in age, height, fat mass, lean body mass, and calcium intake by ANCOVA, professional cyclists had similar head BMD (p=0.383) but lower total body (1.135 (0.071) vs. 1.248 (0.104) g·cm−2; p<0.001), arms (0.903 (0.075) vs. 0.950 (0.085), p=0.028), legs (1.290 (0.112) vs. 1.479 (0.138); p<0.001), spine (0.948 (0.100) vs. 1.117 (0.147) g·cm−2; p<0.001), pelvis (1.054 (0.084) vs. 1.244 (0.142), p<0.001), lumbar spine (1.046 (0.103) vs. 1.244 (0.167), P<0.001), and femoral neck BMD (0.900 (0.115) vs. 1.093 (0.137), p<0.001) compared to reference subjects. Professional cycling appears to negatively affect BMD in young healthy and highly active males, the femoral neck being the most affected site (−18%) in spite of the elevated muscle contractions inherent to the activity.
Citation:
International Journal of Sports Medicine,
Publisher:
Georg Thieme Verlag
Journal:
International Journal of Sports Medicine
Issue Date:
2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/97900
DOI:
10.1055/s-0029-1243616
Additional Links:
https://www.thieme-connect.com/ejournals/toc/sportsmed/efirst
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
ExFirst article published ahead of print
ISSN:
01724622; 14393964
Appears in Collections:
Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group; Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCampion, F.en
dc.contributor.authorNevill, Alan M.en
dc.contributor.authorKarlsson, M. K.en
dc.contributor.authorLounana, J.en
dc.contributor.authorShabani, M.en
dc.contributor.authorFardellone, P.en
dc.contributor.authorMedelli, J.en
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-04T14:54:34Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-04T14:54:34Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Sports Medicine,en
dc.identifier.issn01724622-
dc.identifier.issn14393964-
dc.identifier.doi10.1055/s-0029-1243616-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/97900-
dc.descriptionExFirst article published ahead of printen
dc.description.abstractProfessional cycling combines extensive endurance training with non weight-bearing exercise, two factors often associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD). Therefore BMD was measured with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry in 30 professional road cyclists (mean (SD) age: 29.1 (3.4) years; height: 178.5 (6.7) cm; weight: 71.3 (6.1) kg; %fat mass: 9.7 (3.2)%; V˙O2max: 70.5 (5.5) ml·kg−1·min−1) and in 30 young healthy males used as reference (28.6 (4.5) years; 176.5 (6.3) cm; 73.4 (7.3) kg; 20.7 (5.8)%). Adjusting for differences in age, height, fat mass, lean body mass, and calcium intake by ANCOVA, professional cyclists had similar head BMD (p=0.383) but lower total body (1.135 (0.071) vs. 1.248 (0.104) g·cm−2; p<0.001), arms (0.903 (0.075) vs. 0.950 (0.085), p=0.028), legs (1.290 (0.112) vs. 1.479 (0.138); p<0.001), spine (0.948 (0.100) vs. 1.117 (0.147) g·cm−2; p<0.001), pelvis (1.054 (0.084) vs. 1.244 (0.142), p<0.001), lumbar spine (1.046 (0.103) vs. 1.244 (0.167), P<0.001), and femoral neck BMD (0.900 (0.115) vs. 1.093 (0.137), p<0.001) compared to reference subjects. Professional cycling appears to negatively affect BMD in young healthy and highly active males, the femoral neck being the most affected site (−18%) in spite of the elevated muscle contractions inherent to the activity.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherGeorg Thieme Verlagen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.thieme-connect.com/ejournals/toc/sportsmed/efirsten
dc.subjectBone densityen
dc.subjectDietary calciumen
dc.subjectDual-energy x-ray absorptiometryen
dc.subjectProfessional cyclingen
dc.subjectEndurance trainingen
dc.titleBone status in professional cyclistsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Sports Medicineen
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