University of Wolverhampton
Browse
Collection All
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
Listed communities
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet

Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > Research Institutes > Research Institute in Healthcare Science > Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group > Body mass index: a measure of fatness or leanness?

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/96391
    Del.icio.us     LinkedIn     Citeulike     Connotea     Facebook     Stumble it!



Title: Body mass index: a measure of fatness or leanness?
Authors: Nevill, Alan M.
Holder, Roger L.
Citation: British Journal of Nutrition, 73: 507-516
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Journal: British Journal of Nutrition
Issue Date: 1995
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/96391
Abstract: The relationship between body fat and stature-adjusted weight indices was explored. Assuming the term height’ is a valid indicator of a subject’s lean body mass, heighplweight was shown to be an accurate measure of percentage lean body mass and, as such, a better predictor of percentage body fat than the traditional body mass index (BMI; weight/height’). The name, lean body mass index (LBMI), is proposed for the index height2/weight. These assumptions were confirmed empirically using the results from the Allied Dunbar National Fitness Survey (ADNFS). Using simple allometric modelling, the term heightp explained 74 % of the variance in lean body mass compared with less than 40 YO in body weight. For the majority of ADNFS subjects the fitted exponent from both analyses was approximately p = 2, the only exception being the female subjects aged 55 years and over, where the exponent was found to be significantly less than 2. Using estimates of percentage body fat as the dependent variable, regression analysis was able to confirm that LBMZ was empirically, as well as theoretically, superior to the traditional BMI. Finally, wben the distributional properties of the two indices were compared, BMI was positively skewed and hence deviated considerably from a normal distribution. In contrast, LBMI was found to be both symmetric and normally distributed. When height and weight are recorded in centimetres and kilograms respectively, the suggested working normal range for LBMI is 300-500 with the median at 400.
Type: Article
Language: en
Keywords: Regression models
Percentage body fat
Lean body mass
ISSN: 0007-1145
Appears in Collections: Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group
Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

Files in This Item:
File Description Size Format View/Open
BJNutr BMI_Measures_Nevill_BJNutr_73_507_1995.pdf540KbAdobe PDFThumbnail
View/Open

All Items in WIRE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

Fairtrade - Guarantees a better deal for Third World Producers

University of Wolverhampton, Wulfruna Street, Wolverhampton, WV1 1LY

Course enquiries: 0800 953 3222, General enquiries: 01902 321000,
Email: enquiries@wlv.ac.uk | Freedom of Information | Disclaimer and copyright | Website feedback | The University as a charity

OR Logo Powered by Open Repository | Cookies