Scaling concept II rowing ergometer performance for differences in body mass to better reflect rowing in water

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/92194
Title:
Scaling concept II rowing ergometer performance for differences in body mass to better reflect rowing in water
Authors:
Nevill, Alan M.; Beech, C.; Holder, Roger L.; Wyon, Matthew A.
Abstract:
We investigated whether the concept II indoor rowing ergometer accurately reflects rowing on water. Forty-nine junior elite male rowers from a Great Britain training camp completed a 2000m concept II model C indoor rowing ergometer test and a water-based 2000msingle-scull rowing test. Rowing speed in water (3.66 m/s) was significantly slower than laboratory-based rowing performance (4.96m/s). The relationship between the two rowing performances was found to be R2528.9% (r50.538). We identified that body mass (m) made a positive contribution to concept II rowing ergometer performance (r50.68, Po0.001) but only a small, non-significant contribution to single-scull water rowing performance (r50.039, P50.79). The contribution that m made to single-scull rowing in addition to ergometer rowing speed (using allometric modeling) was found to be negative (Po0.001), confirming that m has a significant drag effect on water rowing speed. The optimal allometric model to predict single-scull rowing speed was the ratio (ergometer speed m 0.23)1.87 that increased R2 from 28.2% to 59.2%. Simply by dividing the concept II rowing ergometer speed by body mass (m0.23), the resulting ‘‘powerto- weight’’ ratio (ergometer speed m 0.23) improves the ability of the concept II rowing performance to reflect rowing on water.
Citation:
Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, 20: 122–127
Publisher:
John Wiley & Sons
Journal:
Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports
Issue Date:
2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/92194
DOI:
10.1111/j.1600-0838.2008.00874.x
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
09057188; 16000838
Appears in Collections:
Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group; Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNevill, Alan M.en
dc.contributor.authorBeech, C.en
dc.contributor.authorHolder, Roger L.en
dc.contributor.authorWyon, Matthew A.en
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-15T16:19:04Z-
dc.date.available2010-02-15T16:19:04Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationScandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, 20: 122–127en
dc.identifier.issn09057188-
dc.identifier.issn16000838-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0838.2008.00874.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/92194-
dc.description.abstractWe investigated whether the concept II indoor rowing ergometer accurately reflects rowing on water. Forty-nine junior elite male rowers from a Great Britain training camp completed a 2000m concept II model C indoor rowing ergometer test and a water-based 2000msingle-scull rowing test. Rowing speed in water (3.66 m/s) was significantly slower than laboratory-based rowing performance (4.96m/s). The relationship between the two rowing performances was found to be R2528.9% (r50.538). We identified that body mass (m) made a positive contribution to concept II rowing ergometer performance (r50.68, Po0.001) but only a small, non-significant contribution to single-scull water rowing performance (r50.039, P50.79). The contribution that m made to single-scull rowing in addition to ergometer rowing speed (using allometric modeling) was found to be negative (Po0.001), confirming that m has a significant drag effect on water rowing speed. The optimal allometric model to predict single-scull rowing speed was the ratio (ergometer speed m 0.23)1.87 that increased R2 from 28.2% to 59.2%. Simply by dividing the concept II rowing ergometer speed by body mass (m0.23), the resulting ‘‘powerto- weight’’ ratio (ergometer speed m 0.23) improves the ability of the concept II rowing performance to reflect rowing on water.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sonsen
dc.subjectBody massen
dc.subjectPower-to-mass ratioen
dc.subjectAllometric modelsen
dc.subjectSingle-scull rowing performanceen
dc.subjectDrag effecten
dc.titleScaling concept II rowing ergometer performance for differences in body mass to better reflect rowing in wateren
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalScandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sportsen
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