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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > Research Institutes > Research Institute in Healthcare Science > Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group > Scaling concept II rowing ergometer performance for differences in body mass to better reflect rowing in water

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/92194
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Title: Scaling concept II rowing ergometer performance for differences in body mass to better reflect rowing in water
Authors: Nevill, Alan M.
Beech, C.
Holder, Roger L.
Wyon, Matthew A.
Citation: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, 20: 122–127
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Journal: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports
Issue Date: 2010
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/92194
DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0838.2008.00874.x
Abstract: We investigated whether the concept II indoor rowing ergometer accurately reflects rowing on water. Forty-nine junior elite male rowers from a Great Britain training camp completed a 2000m concept II model C indoor rowing ergometer test and a water-based 2000msingle-scull rowing test. Rowing speed in water (3.66 m/s) was significantly slower than laboratory-based rowing performance (4.96m/s). The relationship between the two rowing performances was found to be R2528.9% (r50.538). We identified that body mass (m) made a positive contribution to concept II rowing ergometer performance (r50.68, Po0.001) but only a small, non-significant contribution to single-scull water rowing performance (r50.039, P50.79). The contribution that m made to single-scull rowing in addition to ergometer rowing speed (using allometric modeling) was found to be negative (Po0.001), confirming that m has a significant drag effect on water rowing speed. The optimal allometric model to predict single-scull rowing speed was the ratio (ergometer speed m 0.23)1.87 that increased R2 from 28.2% to 59.2%. Simply by dividing the concept II rowing ergometer speed by body mass (m0.23), the resulting ‘‘powerto- weight’’ ratio (ergometer speed m 0.23) improves the ability of the concept II rowing performance to reflect rowing on water.
Type: Article
Language: en
Keywords: Body mass
Power-to-mass ratio
Allometric models
Single-scull rowing performance
Drag effect
ISSN: 09057188
16000838
Appears in Collections: Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group
Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

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