Cardiovascular disease risk factors in habitual exercisers, lean sedentary men and abdominally obese sedentary men.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/82896
Title:
Cardiovascular disease risk factors in habitual exercisers, lean sedentary men and abdominally obese sedentary men.
Authors:
O'Donovan, G.; Owen, A.; Kearney, E. M.; Jones, D. W.; Nevill, Alan M.; Woolf-May, K.; Bird, Steve
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the favourable cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor profile of habitual exercisers is attributable to exercise or leanness. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study of 113 nonsmoking men aged 30-45 y. CVD risk factors were compared in exercisers (n=39) and sedentary men (n=74), and in subgroups of lean exercisers (n=37), lean sedentary men (n=46) and obese sedentary men (n=28). Waist girth was used to identify lean (<100 cm) and abdominally obese (> or =100 cm) subgroups. MEASUREMENTS: Blood pressure, physical activity (7-day recall), physical fitness (maximum oxygen consumption) and fasted lipoproteins, apolipoprotein (apo) B, triglycerides, glucose and fibrinogen. RESULTS: Exercisers were fitter and leaner than sedentary men and had a better CVD risk factor profile. Total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and apo B concentrations were lower in lean exercisers than in lean sedentary men, suggesting that exercise influences these risk factors. Indeed, time spent in vigorous activity was the only significant predictor of total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol in multiple linear regression models. Exercise status had little influence on triglycerides and HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), and unfavourable levels were only evident among obese sedentary men. Waist girth was the sole predictor of triglycerides and HDL-C, explaining 44 and 31% of the variance, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the CVD risk factor profile of habitual exercisers is attributable to leanness and exercise. Leanness is associated with favourable levels of HDL-C and triglycerides, while exercise is associated with lower levels of total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and apo B.
Citation:
International Journal of Obesity, 29 (9):1063-1069
Publisher:
nature.com
Journal:
International Journal of Obesity
Issue Date:
2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/82896
DOI:
10.1038/sj.ijo.0803004
PubMed ID:
15925958
Additional Links:
http://www.nature.com/ijo/journal/v29/n9/abs/0803004a.html; http://direct.bl.uk/bld/PlaceOrder.do?UIN=172400757&ETOC=RN&from=searchengine
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0307-0565
Appears in Collections:
Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group; Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Donovan, G.en
dc.contributor.authorOwen, A.en
dc.contributor.authorKearney, E. M.en
dc.contributor.authorJones, D. W.en
dc.contributor.authorNevill, Alan M.en
dc.contributor.authorWoolf-May, K.en
dc.contributor.authorBird, Steveen
dc.date.accessioned2009-09-28T21:29:04Z-
dc.date.available2009-09-28T21:29:04Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Obesity, 29 (9):1063-1069en
dc.identifier.issn0307-0565-
dc.identifier.pmid15925958-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/sj.ijo.0803004-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/82896-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the favourable cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor profile of habitual exercisers is attributable to exercise or leanness. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study of 113 nonsmoking men aged 30-45 y. CVD risk factors were compared in exercisers (n=39) and sedentary men (n=74), and in subgroups of lean exercisers (n=37), lean sedentary men (n=46) and obese sedentary men (n=28). Waist girth was used to identify lean (<100 cm) and abdominally obese (> or =100 cm) subgroups. MEASUREMENTS: Blood pressure, physical activity (7-day recall), physical fitness (maximum oxygen consumption) and fasted lipoproteins, apolipoprotein (apo) B, triglycerides, glucose and fibrinogen. RESULTS: Exercisers were fitter and leaner than sedentary men and had a better CVD risk factor profile. Total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and apo B concentrations were lower in lean exercisers than in lean sedentary men, suggesting that exercise influences these risk factors. Indeed, time spent in vigorous activity was the only significant predictor of total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol in multiple linear regression models. Exercise status had little influence on triglycerides and HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), and unfavourable levels were only evident among obese sedentary men. Waist girth was the sole predictor of triglycerides and HDL-C, explaining 44 and 31% of the variance, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the CVD risk factor profile of habitual exercisers is attributable to leanness and exercise. Leanness is associated with favourable levels of HDL-C and triglycerides, while exercise is associated with lower levels of total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and apo B.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publishernature.comen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/ijo/journal/v29/n9/abs/0803004a.htmlen
dc.relation.urlhttp://direct.bl.uk/bld/PlaceOrder.do?UIN=172400757&ETOC=RN&from=searchengineen
dc.subjectSedentary adultsen
dc.subjectSedentary adult menen
dc.subjectSports Scienceen
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshApolipoproteins Ben
dc.subject.meshBlood Pressureen
dc.subject.meshBody Fat Distributionen
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseasesen
dc.subject.meshCholesterolen
dc.subject.meshCholesterol, HDLen
dc.subject.meshCholesterol, LDLen
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen
dc.subject.meshEnergy Metabolismen
dc.subject.meshExerciseen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshObesityen
dc.subject.meshOxygen Consumptionen
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.subject.meshThinnessen
dc.subject.meshTriglyceridesen
dc.titleCardiovascular disease risk factors in habitual exercisers, lean sedentary men and abdominally obese sedentary men.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Obesityen

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