2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/82895
Title:
Effect of the Rotor crank system on cycling performance
Authors:
Jobson, Simon A.; Hopker, James; Galbraith, Andrew; Coleman, Damian A.; Nevill, Alan M.
Abstract:
The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a novel crank system on laboratory time-trial cycling performance. The Rotor system makes each pedal independent from the other so that the cranks are no longer fixed at 180°. Twelve male competitive but non-elite cyclists (mean ± s: 35 ± 7 yr, Wmax = 363 ± 38 W, VO2peak = 4.5 ± 0.3 L·min-1) completed 6-weeks of their normal training using either a conventional (CON) or the novel Rotor (ROT) pedal system. All participants then completed two 40.23-km time-trials on an air-braked ergometer, one using CON and one using ROT. Mean performance speeds were not different between trials (CON = 41.7 km·h-1 vs. ROT = 41.6 km·h-1, P > 0.05). Indeed, the pedal system used during the time-trials had no impact on any of the measured variables (power output, cadence, heart rate, VO2, RER, gross efficiency). Furthermore, the ANOVA identified no significant interaction effect between main effects (Time-trial crank system*Training crank system, P > 0.05). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to examine the effects of the Rotor system on endurance performance rather than endurance capacity. These results suggest that the Rotor system has no measurable impact on time-trial performance. However, further studies should examine the importance of the Rotor 'regulation point' and the suggestion that the Rotor system has acute ergogenic effects if used infrequently.
Citation:
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 8(3): 463-467
Journal:
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Issue Date:
2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/82895
Additional Links:
http://www.jssm.org/vol8/n3/21/v8n3-21abst.php
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1303-2968
Appears in Collections:
Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group; Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJobson, Simon A.en
dc.contributor.authorHopker, Jamesen
dc.contributor.authorGalbraith, Andrewen
dc.contributor.authorColeman, Damian A.en
dc.contributor.authorNevill, Alan M.en
dc.date.accessioned2009-09-28T21:15:54Z-
dc.date.available2009-09-28T21:15:54Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Sports Science and Medicine, 8(3): 463-467en
dc.identifier.issn1303-2968-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/82895-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a novel crank system on laboratory time-trial cycling performance. The Rotor system makes each pedal independent from the other so that the cranks are no longer fixed at 180°. Twelve male competitive but non-elite cyclists (mean ± s: 35 ± 7 yr, Wmax = 363 ± 38 W, VO2peak = 4.5 ± 0.3 L·min-1) completed 6-weeks of their normal training using either a conventional (CON) or the novel Rotor (ROT) pedal system. All participants then completed two 40.23-km time-trials on an air-braked ergometer, one using CON and one using ROT. Mean performance speeds were not different between trials (CON = 41.7 km·h-1 vs. ROT = 41.6 km·h-1, P > 0.05). Indeed, the pedal system used during the time-trials had no impact on any of the measured variables (power output, cadence, heart rate, VO2, RER, gross efficiency). Furthermore, the ANOVA identified no significant interaction effect between main effects (Time-trial crank system*Training crank system, P > 0.05). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to examine the effects of the Rotor system on endurance performance rather than endurance capacity. These results suggest that the Rotor system has no measurable impact on time-trial performance. However, further studies should examine the importance of the Rotor 'regulation point' and the suggestion that the Rotor system has acute ergogenic effects if used infrequently.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.jssm.org/vol8/n3/21/v8n3-21abst.phpen
dc.subjectCycling performanceen
dc.subjectCyclingen
dc.subjectSports Scienceen
dc.subjectAthletesen
dc.subjectBicycle equipmenten
dc.subjectRotor crank systemen
dc.subjectEfficiencyen
dc.subjectTime-trial cyclingen
dc.subjectMale athletesen
dc.titleEffect of the Rotor crank system on cycling performanceen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Sports Science and Medicineen
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