Modelling the relationship between isokinetic muscle strength and sprint running performance.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/82893
Title:
Modelling the relationship between isokinetic muscle strength and sprint running performance.
Authors:
Dowson, M. N.; Nevill, Mary E.; Lakomy, H. K.; Nevill, Alan M.; Hazeldine, R. J.
Abstract:
Muscle strength is thought to be a major factor in athletic success. However, the relationship between muscle strength and sprint performance has received little attention. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship in elite performers of isokinetic muscle strength across three lower limb joints and sprinting performance, including the use of theoretical models. Eight rugby players, eight track sprinters and eight competitive sportsmen, all elite national or regional competitors, performed sprints over 15 m and 35 m with times recorded over 0-15 m and 30-35 m. Isokinetic torque was measured at the knee, hip and ankle joints at low (1.05 rad s(-1)), intermediate (2.09 or 2.62 rad s(-1)) and high (3.14 or 4.19 rad s(-1)) speeds during concentric and eccentric muscle actions. Using linear regression and expressing sprint performance as time, the strongest relationship, for the joint actions and speeds tested, was between concentric knee extension at 4.19 rad s(-1) and sprint performance (0-15 m times: r=-0.518, P< 0.01; 30-35 m times: r=-0.688, P< 0.01). These relationships were improved for 0-15 m, but not for 30-35 m, by expressing torque relative to body mass (0-15 m times: r=-0.581; 30-35 m times: r=-0.659). When 0-15 m performance was expressed as acceleration rather than time, the correlation was improved slightly (r=0.590). However, when the data (0-15 m times) were fitted to the allometric force model proposed by Gunther, 77% of the variance in concentric knee extension torque at 4.19 rad s(-1) could be explained by 0-15 m times, limb length (knee to buttocks) and body mass. The fitted parameters were similar to those from the theoretical model. These findings suggest that the relationship between isokinetic muscle strength and sprint performance over 0-15 m (during the acceleration phase) is improved by taking limb length and body mass into account.
Citation:
Journal of Sports Sciences, 16(3): 257-265
Publisher:
London: Taylor & Francis Ltd.
Journal:
Journal of Sports Sciences
Issue Date:
1998
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/82893
DOI:
10.1080/026404198366786
PubMed ID:
9596360
Additional Links:
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/tandf/rjsp/1998/00000016/00000003/art00005
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0264-0414; 1466447X
Appears in Collections:
Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group; Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDowson, M. N.en
dc.contributor.authorNevill, Mary E.en
dc.contributor.authorLakomy, H. K.en
dc.contributor.authorNevill, Alan M.en
dc.contributor.authorHazeldine, R. J.en
dc.date.accessioned2009-09-28T20:22:33Z-
dc.date.available2009-09-28T20:22:33Z-
dc.date.issued1998-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Sports Sciences, 16(3): 257-265en
dc.identifier.issn0264-0414-
dc.identifier.issn1466447X-
dc.identifier.pmid9596360-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/026404198366786-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/82893-
dc.description.abstractMuscle strength is thought to be a major factor in athletic success. However, the relationship between muscle strength and sprint performance has received little attention. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship in elite performers of isokinetic muscle strength across three lower limb joints and sprinting performance, including the use of theoretical models. Eight rugby players, eight track sprinters and eight competitive sportsmen, all elite national or regional competitors, performed sprints over 15 m and 35 m with times recorded over 0-15 m and 30-35 m. Isokinetic torque was measured at the knee, hip and ankle joints at low (1.05 rad s(-1)), intermediate (2.09 or 2.62 rad s(-1)) and high (3.14 or 4.19 rad s(-1)) speeds during concentric and eccentric muscle actions. Using linear regression and expressing sprint performance as time, the strongest relationship, for the joint actions and speeds tested, was between concentric knee extension at 4.19 rad s(-1) and sprint performance (0-15 m times: r=-0.518, P< 0.01; 30-35 m times: r=-0.688, P< 0.01). These relationships were improved for 0-15 m, but not for 30-35 m, by expressing torque relative to body mass (0-15 m times: r=-0.581; 30-35 m times: r=-0.659). When 0-15 m performance was expressed as acceleration rather than time, the correlation was improved slightly (r=0.590). However, when the data (0-15 m times) were fitted to the allometric force model proposed by Gunther, 77% of the variance in concentric knee extension torque at 4.19 rad s(-1) could be explained by 0-15 m times, limb length (knee to buttocks) and body mass. The fitted parameters were similar to those from the theoretical model. These findings suggest that the relationship between isokinetic muscle strength and sprint performance over 0-15 m (during the acceleration phase) is improved by taking limb length and body mass into account.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLondon: Taylor & Francis Ltd.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/tandf/rjsp/1998/00000016/00000003/art00005en
dc.subjectAllometric modellingen
dc.subjectSports Medicineen
dc.subjectIsokinetic muscle strengthen
dc.subjectMuscle Strengthen
dc.subjectSprintingen
dc.subjectAthletesen
dc.subject.meshAnalysis of Varianceen
dc.subject.meshAnkleen
dc.subject.meshBiomechanicsen
dc.subject.meshCompetitive Behavioren
dc.subject.meshExercise Testen
dc.subject.meshHipen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshKneeen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshModels, Biologicalen
dc.subject.meshMuscle Contractionen
dc.subject.meshMuscle, Skeletalen
dc.subject.meshRegression Analysisen
dc.subject.meshRunningen
dc.subject.meshTorqueen
dc.titleModelling the relationship between isokinetic muscle strength and sprint running performance.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Sports Sciencesen
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