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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Sport, Performing Arts and Leisure > Research Centre for Sport, Exercise and Performance > Sport Performance > Modelling home advantage in the Summer Olympic Games.

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/8013
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Title: Modelling home advantage in the Summer Olympic Games.
Authors: Balmer, Nigel J.
Nevill, Alan M.
Williams, A. Mark
Citation: Journal of Sports Sciences, 21(6): 469-478
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Issue Date: 2003
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/8013
PubMed ID: 12846534
Additional Links: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/tandf/rjsp/2003/00000021/00000006/art00004
http://direct.bl.uk/bld/PlaceOrder.do?UIN=132732747&ETOC=RN&from=searchengine
Abstract: Home advantage in team games is well proven and the influence of the crowd upon officials' decisions has been identified as a plausible cause. The aim of this study was to assess the significance of home advantage for five event groups selected from the Summer Olympic Games between 1896 and 1996, and put home advantage in team games in context with other sports. The five event groups were athletics and weightlifting (predominantly objectively judged), boxing and gymnastics (predominantly subjectively judged) and team games (involving subjective decisions). The proportion of points won was analysed as a binomial response variable using generalized linear interactive modelling. Preliminary exploration of the data highlighted the need to control for the proportion of competitors entered and to split the analysis pre- and post-war. Highly significant home advantage was found in event groups that were either subjectively judged or rely on subjective decisions. In contrast, little or no home advantage (and even away advantage) was observed for the two objectively judged groups. Officiating system was vital to both the existence and extent of home advantage. Our findings suggest that crowd noise has a greater influence upon officials' decisions than players' performances, as events with greater officiating input enjoyed significantly greater home advantage.
Type: Article
Language: en
Keywords: Home advantage
Summer Olympic Games
Team games
Athletes
Sporting events
ISSN: 0264-0414
Appears in Collections: Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group
Sport Performance
Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

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