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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Sport, Performing Arts and Leisure > Research Centre for Sport, Exercise and Performance > Sport Performance > Home advantage in the Winter Olympics (1908-1998).

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/8008
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Title: Home advantage in the Winter Olympics (1908-1998).
Authors: Balmer, Nigel J.
Nevill, Alan M.
Williams, A. Mark
Citation: J Sports Sci 2001, 19(2):129-39
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Issue Date: 2001
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/8008
PubMed ID: 11217011
Additional Links: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=sph&AN=SPHS-671984&site=ehost-live
Abstract: We obtained indices of home advantage, based on the medals won by competing nations, for each event held at the Winter Olympics from 1908 to 1998. These indices were designed to assess home advantage while controlling for nation strength, changes in the number of medals on offer and the performance of 'non-hosting' nations. Some evidence of home advantage was found in figure skating, freestyle skiing, ski jumping, alpine skiing and short track speed skating. In contrast, little or no home advantage was observed in ice hockey, Nordic combined, Nordic skiing, bobsled, luge, biathlon or speed skating. When all events were combined, a significant home advantage was observed (P = 0.029), although no significant differences in the extent of home advantage were found between events (P > 0.05). When events were grouped according to whether they were subjectively assessed by judges, significantly greater home advantage was observed in the subjectively assessed events (P = 0.037). This was a reflection of better home performances, suggesting that judges were scoring home competitors disproportionately higher than away competitors. Familiarity with local conditions was shown to have some effect, particularly in alpine skiing, although the bobsled and luge showed little or no advantage over other events. Regression analysis showed that the number of time zones and direction of travel produced no discernible trends or differences in performance.
Type: Article
Language: en
Keywords: Home advantage
Winter Olympics
Athletes
Sporting events
ISSN: 0264-0414
Appears in Collections: Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group
Sport Performance
Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

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