University of Wolverhampton
Browse
Collection All
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
Listed communities
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet

Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Sport, Performing Arts and Leisure > Research Centre for Sport, Exercise and Performance > Exercise and Health > Scaling physiological measurements for individuals of different body size.

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/8005
    Del.icio.us     LinkedIn     Citeulike     Connotea     Facebook     Stumble it!



Title: Scaling physiological measurements for individuals of different body size.
Authors: Nevill, Alan M.
Ramsbottom, Roger
Williams, Clyde
Citation: European Journal of Applied Physiology, 65(2): 110-117
Publisher: Springer Verlag
Issue Date: 1992
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/8005
DOI: 10.1007/BF00705066
PubMed ID: 1396632
Additional Links: http://www.springerlink.com/content/g34726g217887553/
Abstract: This paper examines how selected physiological performance variables, such as maximal oxygen uptake, strength and power, might best be scaled for subject differences in body size. The apparent dilemma between using either ratio standards or a linear adjustment method to scale was investigated by considering how maximal oxygen uptake (l.min-1), peak and mean power output (W) might best be adjusted for differences in body mass (kg). A curvilinear power function model was shown to be theoretically, physiologically and empirically superior to the linear models. Based on the fitted power functions, the best method of scaling maximum oxygen uptake, peak and mean power output, required these variables to be divided by body mass, recorded in the units kg 2/3. Hence, the power function ratio standards (ml.kg-2/3.min-1) and (W.kg-2/3) were best able to describe a wide range of subjects in terms of their physiological capacity, i.e. their ability to utilise oxygen or record power maximally, independent of body size. The simple ratio standards (ml.kg-1.min-1) and (W.kg-1) were found to best describe the same subjects according to their performance capacities or ability to run which are highly dependent on body size. The appropriate model to explain the experimental design effects on such ratio standards was shown to be log-normal rather than normal. Simply by taking logarithms of the power function ratio standard, identical solutions for the design effects are obtained using either ANOVA or, by taking the unscaled physiological variable as the dependent variable and the body size variable as the covariate, ANCOVA methods.
Type: Article
Language: en
Keywords: Ratio standards
Physiological capacity
Performance capacity
Experimental design effects
Log-linear models
ISSN: 0301-5548
Appears in Collections: Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group
Exercise and Health
Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

Files in This Item:
File Description Size Format View/Open
Nevill.pdf810KbAdobe PDFThumbnail
View/Open

Related articles on PubMed
bullet
bullet
bullet
Scaling or normalising maximum oxygen uptake to predict 1-mile run time in boys.
Nevill A, Rowland T, Goff D, Martel L, Ferrone L
2004 Jul
bullet
Maximal oxygen uptake at the same fat-free mass is greater in men than women.
Davis JA, Wilson LD, Caiozzo VJ, Storer TW, Pham PH
2006 Jan
bullet
Scaling peak VO2 for differences in body size.
Welsman JR, Armstrong N, Nevill AM, Winter EM, Kirby BJ
1996 Feb
See all 86 articles

All Items in WIRE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

Fairtrade - Guarantees a better deal for Third World Producers

University of Wolverhampton, Wulfruna Street, Wolverhampton, WV1 1LY

Course enquiries: 0800 953 3222, General enquiries: 01902 321000,
Email: enquiries@wlv.ac.uk | Freedom of Information | Disclaimer and copyright | Website feedback | The University as a charity

OR Logo Powered by Open Repository | Cookies