2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/7756
Title:
Optimal power-to-mass ratios when predicting flat and hill-climbing time-trial cycling.
Authors:
Nevill, Alan M.; Jobson, Simon A.; Davison, R.C.R.; Jeukendrup, A.E.
Other Titles:
Cycling
Abstract:
The purpose of this article was to establish whether previously reported oxygen-to-mass ratios, used to predict flat and hill-climbing cycling performance, extend to similar power-to-mass ratios incorporating other, often quick and convenient measures of power output recorded in the laboratory [maximum aerobic power (W(MAP)), power output at ventilatory threshold (W(VT)) and average power output (W(AVG)) maintained during a 1 h performance test]. A proportional allometric model was used to predict the optimal power-to-mass ratios associated with cycling speeds during flat and hill-climbing cycling. The optimal models predicting flat time-trial cycling speeds were found to be (W(MAP)m(-0.48))(0.54), (W(VT)m(-0.48))(0.46) and (W(AVG)m(-0.34))(0.58) that explained 69.3, 59.1 and 96.3% of the variance in cycling speeds, respectively. Cross-validation results suggest that, in conjunction with body mass, W(MAP) can provide an accurate and independent prediction of time-trial cycling, explaining 94.6% of the variance in cycling speeds with the standard deviation about the regression line, s=0.686 km h(-1). Based on these models, there is evidence to support that previously reported VO2-to-mass ratios associated with flat cycling speed extend to other laboratory-recorded measures of power output (i.e. Wm(-0.32)). However, the power-function exponents (0.54, 0.46 and 0.58) would appear to conflict with the assumption that the cyclists' speeds should be proportional to the cube root (0.33) of power demand/expended, a finding that could be explained by other confounding variables such as bicycle geometry, tractional resistance and/or the presence of a tailwind. The models predicting 6 and 12% hill-climbing cycling speeds were found to be proportional to (W(MAP)m(-0.91))(0.66), revealing a mass exponent, 0.91, that also supports previous research.
Citation:
European Journal of Applied Physiology, 97(4): 424-431
Publisher:
Springer Berlin / Heidelberg
Journal:
European Journal of Applied Physiology
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/7756
DOI:
10.1007/s00421-006-0189-6
PubMed ID:
16685550
Additional Links:
http://www.springerlink.com/content/l140p0304285u540/
Submitted date:
2007-01-25
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1439-6319
Appears in Collections:
Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group; Sport Performance; Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNevill, Alan M.-
dc.contributor.authorJobson, Simon A.-
dc.contributor.authorDavison, R.C.R.-
dc.contributor.authorJeukendrup, A.E.-
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-25T16:12:51Z-
dc.date.available2007-01-25T16:12:51Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.date.submitted2007-01-25-
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal of Applied Physiology, 97(4): 424-431en
dc.identifier.issn1439-6319-
dc.identifier.pmid16685550-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00421-006-0189-6-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/7756-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this article was to establish whether previously reported oxygen-to-mass ratios, used to predict flat and hill-climbing cycling performance, extend to similar power-to-mass ratios incorporating other, often quick and convenient measures of power output recorded in the laboratory [maximum aerobic power (W(MAP)), power output at ventilatory threshold (W(VT)) and average power output (W(AVG)) maintained during a 1 h performance test]. A proportional allometric model was used to predict the optimal power-to-mass ratios associated with cycling speeds during flat and hill-climbing cycling. The optimal models predicting flat time-trial cycling speeds were found to be (W(MAP)m(-0.48))(0.54), (W(VT)m(-0.48))(0.46) and (W(AVG)m(-0.34))(0.58) that explained 69.3, 59.1 and 96.3% of the variance in cycling speeds, respectively. Cross-validation results suggest that, in conjunction with body mass, W(MAP) can provide an accurate and independent prediction of time-trial cycling, explaining 94.6% of the variance in cycling speeds with the standard deviation about the regression line, s=0.686 km h(-1). Based on these models, there is evidence to support that previously reported VO2-to-mass ratios associated with flat cycling speed extend to other laboratory-recorded measures of power output (i.e. Wm(-0.32)). However, the power-function exponents (0.54, 0.46 and 0.58) would appear to conflict with the assumption that the cyclists' speeds should be proportional to the cube root (0.33) of power demand/expended, a finding that could be explained by other confounding variables such as bicycle geometry, tractional resistance and/or the presence of a tailwind. The models predicting 6 and 12% hill-climbing cycling speeds were found to be proportional to (W(MAP)m(-0.91))(0.66), revealing a mass exponent, 0.91, that also supports previous research.en
dc.format.extent303402 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer Berlin / Heidelbergen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.springerlink.com/content/l140p0304285u540/en
dc.subjectTime-trial cyclingen
dc.subjectPower outputen
dc.subjectHill-climbingen
dc.subjectSports Medicineen
dc.subjectSpeed measurementen
dc.subjectPerformance measurement-
dc.titleOptimal power-to-mass ratios when predicting flat and hill-climbing time-trial cycling.en
dc.title.alternativeCycling-
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalEuropean Journal of Applied Physiology-
dc.format.digYES-

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