Modelling the influence of age, body size and sex on maximum oxygen uptake in older humans.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/76882
Title:
Modelling the influence of age, body size and sex on maximum oxygen uptake in older humans.
Authors:
Johnson, Patrick J.; Winter, Edward M.; Paterson, Don H.; Koval, John J.; Nevill, Alan M.; Cunningham, David A.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to describe the influence of body size and sex on the decline in maximum oxygen uptake (O2,max) in older men and women. A stratified random sample of 152 men and 146 women, aged 55-86 years, was drawn from the study population. Influence of age on O2,max, independent of differences in body mass (BM) or fat-free mass (FFM), was investigated using the following allometric model: O2,max = BMb (or FFMb) exp(a + (c ' age) + (d ' sex)) [epsilon]. The model was linearised and parameters identified using standard multiple regression. The BM model explained 68.8 % of the variance in O2,max. The parameters (+/- s.e.e., standard error of the estimate) for lnBM (0.563 +/- 0.070), age (-0.0154 +/- 0.0012), sex (0.242 +/- 0.024) and the intercept (-1.09 +/- 0.32) were all significant (P < 0.001). The FFM model explained 69.3 % of the variance in O2,max, and the parameters (+/- s.e.e) lnFFM (0.772 +/- 0.090), age (-0.0159 +/- 0.0012) and the intercept (-1.57 +/- 0.36) were significant (P < 0.001), while sex (0.077 +/- 0.038) was significant at P = 0.0497. Regardless of the model used, the age-associated decline was similar, with a relative decline of 15 % per decade (0.984 exp(age)) in O2,max in older humans being estimated. The study has demonstrated that, for a randomly drawn sample, the age-related loss in O2,max is determined, in part, by the loss of fat-free body mass. When this factor is accounted for, the loss of O2,max across age is similar in older men and women.
Affiliation:
Department of Exercise Physiology, De Montfort University Bedford, Bedford MK40 2BZ, UK.
Citation:
Experimental physiology 2000, 85 (2):219-25
Publisher:
The Physiological Society
Journal:
Experimental physiology
Issue Date:
Mar-2000
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/76882
PubMed ID:
10751519
Additional Links:
http://ep.physoc.org/content/85/2/219.abstract
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0958-0670
EISSN:
1469-445x
Appears in Collections:
Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group; Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Patrick J.-
dc.contributor.authorWinter, Edward M.-
dc.contributor.authorPaterson, Don H.-
dc.contributor.authorKoval, John J.-
dc.contributor.authorNevill, Alan M.-
dc.contributor.authorCunningham, David A.-
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-11T13:09:37Z-
dc.date.available2009-08-11T13:09:37Z-
dc.date.issued2000-03-
dc.identifier.citationExperimental physiology 2000, 85 (2):219-25en
dc.identifier.issn0958-0670-
dc.identifier.pmid10751519-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/76882-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to describe the influence of body size and sex on the decline in maximum oxygen uptake (O2,max) in older men and women. A stratified random sample of 152 men and 146 women, aged 55-86 years, was drawn from the study population. Influence of age on O2,max, independent of differences in body mass (BM) or fat-free mass (FFM), was investigated using the following allometric model: O2,max = BMb (or FFMb) exp(a + (c ' age) + (d ' sex)) [epsilon]. The model was linearised and parameters identified using standard multiple regression. The BM model explained 68.8 % of the variance in O2,max. The parameters (+/- s.e.e., standard error of the estimate) for lnBM (0.563 +/- 0.070), age (-0.0154 +/- 0.0012), sex (0.242 +/- 0.024) and the intercept (-1.09 +/- 0.32) were all significant (P < 0.001). The FFM model explained 69.3 % of the variance in O2,max, and the parameters (+/- s.e.e) lnFFM (0.772 +/- 0.090), age (-0.0159 +/- 0.0012) and the intercept (-1.57 +/- 0.36) were significant (P < 0.001), while sex (0.077 +/- 0.038) was significant at P = 0.0497. Regardless of the model used, the age-associated decline was similar, with a relative decline of 15 % per decade (0.984 exp(age)) in O2,max in older humans being estimated. The study has demonstrated that, for a randomly drawn sample, the age-related loss in O2,max is determined, in part, by the loss of fat-free body mass. When this factor is accounted for, the loss of O2,max across age is similar in older men and women.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe Physiological Societyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://ep.physoc.org/content/85/2/219.abstracten
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen
dc.subject.meshAgingen
dc.subject.meshBody Compositionen
dc.subject.meshBody Constitutionen
dc.subject.meshBody Weighten
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshModels, Biologicalen
dc.subject.meshOxygen Consumptionen
dc.subject.meshSex Characteristicsen
dc.titleModelling the influence of age, body size and sex on maximum oxygen uptake in older humans.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1469-445x-
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Exercise Physiology, De Montfort University Bedford, Bedford MK40 2BZ, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalExperimental physiologyen

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