Antimicrobial properties of garlic oil against human enteric bacteria: evaluation of methodologies and comparisons with garlic oil sulfides and garlic powder.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/7650
Title:
Antimicrobial properties of garlic oil against human enteric bacteria: evaluation of methodologies and comparisons with garlic oil sulfides and garlic powder.
Authors:
Ross, Z.M.; O'Gara, Elizabeth A.; Hill, David J.; Sleightholme, H.V.; Maslin, David J.
Abstract:
The antimicrobial effects of aqueous garlic extracts are well established but those of garlic oil (GO) are little known. Methodologies for estimating the antimicrobial activity of GO were assessed and GO, GO sulfide constituents, and garlic powder (GP) were compared in tests against human enteric bacteria. Test methodologies were identified as capable of producing underestimates of GO activity. Antimicrobial activity was greater in media lacking tryptone or cysteine, suggesting that, as for allicin, GO effects may involve sulfhydryl reactivity. All bacteria tested, which included both gram-negative and -positive bacteria and pathogenic forms, were susceptible to garlic materials. On a weight-of-product basis, 24 h MICs for GO (0.02 to 5.5 mg/ml, 62 enteric isolates) and dimethyl trisulfide (0.02 to 0.31 mg/ml, 6 enteric isolates) were lower than those for a mixture of diallyl sulfides (0.63 to 25 mg/ml, 6 enteric isolates) and for GP, which also exhibited a smaller MIC range (6.25 to 12.5 mg/ml, 29 enteric isolates). Viability time studies of GO and GP against Enterobacter aerogenes showed time- and dose-dependent effects. Based upon its thiosulfinate content, GP was more active than GO against most bacteria, although some properties of GO are identified as offering greater therapeutic potential. Further exploration of the potential of GP and GO in enteric disease control appears warranted.
Citation:
Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 67(1): 475-480
Publisher:
American Society for Microbiology.
Issue Date:
2001
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/7650
DOI:
10.1128/AEM.67.1.475-480.2001
PubMed ID:
11133485
Additional Links:
http://aem.asm.org/cgi/content/abstract/67/1/475
Submitted date:
2007-01-19
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0099-2240
Appears in Collections:
Food Biology, Medical Microbiology and Disinfection Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRoss, Z.M.-
dc.contributor.authorO'Gara, Elizabeth A.-
dc.contributor.authorHill, David J.-
dc.contributor.authorSleightholme, H.V.-
dc.contributor.authorMaslin, David J.-
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-19T16:28:52Z-
dc.date.available2007-01-19T16:28:52Z-
dc.date.issued2001-
dc.date.submitted2007-01-19-
dc.identifier.citationApplied and Environmental Microbiology, 67(1): 475-480en
dc.identifier.issn0099-2240-
dc.identifier.pmid11133485-
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/AEM.67.1.475-480.2001-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/7650-
dc.description.abstractThe antimicrobial effects of aqueous garlic extracts are well established but those of garlic oil (GO) are little known. Methodologies for estimating the antimicrobial activity of GO were assessed and GO, GO sulfide constituents, and garlic powder (GP) were compared in tests against human enteric bacteria. Test methodologies were identified as capable of producing underestimates of GO activity. Antimicrobial activity was greater in media lacking tryptone or cysteine, suggesting that, as for allicin, GO effects may involve sulfhydryl reactivity. All bacteria tested, which included both gram-negative and -positive bacteria and pathogenic forms, were susceptible to garlic materials. On a weight-of-product basis, 24 h MICs for GO (0.02 to 5.5 mg/ml, 62 enteric isolates) and dimethyl trisulfide (0.02 to 0.31 mg/ml, 6 enteric isolates) were lower than those for a mixture of diallyl sulfides (0.63 to 25 mg/ml, 6 enteric isolates) and for GP, which also exhibited a smaller MIC range (6.25 to 12.5 mg/ml, 29 enteric isolates). Viability time studies of GO and GP against Enterobacter aerogenes showed time- and dose-dependent effects. Based upon its thiosulfinate content, GP was more active than GO against most bacteria, although some properties of GO are identified as offering greater therapeutic potential. Further exploration of the potential of GP and GO in enteric disease control appears warranted.en
dc.format.extent85320 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiology.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://aem.asm.org/cgi/content/abstract/67/1/475-
dc.titleAntimicrobial properties of garlic oil against human enteric bacteria: evaluation of methodologies and comparisons with garlic oil sulfides and garlic powder.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.format.digYES-

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