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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Sport, Performing Arts and Leisure > Research Centre for Sport, Exercise and Performance > Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance > Self-efficacy and Dissertation Performance Among Sport Students

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/7613
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Title: Self-efficacy and Dissertation Performance Among Sport Students
Other Titles: Students
Authors: Lane, Andrew M.
Devonport, Tracey J.
Milton, Karen E.
Williams, Laura C.
Citation: Journal of Hospitality, Leisure, Sports and Tourism Education, 2(2): 59-66
Publisher: Hospitality, Leisure, Sport & Tourism Network, Oxford Brookes University
Issue Date: 2003
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/7613
Additional Links: http://business.heacademy.ac.uk/assets/hlst/documents/johlste/vol2no2/0046.pdf
Abstract: The present study investigated relationships between self-efficacy and dissertation performance among a sample of undergraduate sports studies students. Sixty Level 3 student volunteers completed an open-ended questionnaire to assess competencies needed for dissertation success. Qualitative results identified that self-efficacy was conceptualised in six themes: 1) maintaining motivation, 2) planning, 3) obtaining support, 4) understanding theory, 5) organising time, and 6) effectively writing the dissertation. These themes were developed into a 30-item questionnaire using the same approach as Lane, Hall and Lane (2002). Participants completed the self-efficacy inventory six weeks before the dissertation submission date. Results indicated that self-efficacy toward obtaining support (r = .30, p < .05), understanding theory (r = .35, p < .05), and writing skills (r = .30, p < .05) were associated with good grades. The sum of self-efficacy factors significantly correlated with performance (r = .27, p < .05). Discriminant function analysis results indicated that 80 per cent of failing students could be correctly classified from self-efficacy scores. Findings lend support to previous research that shows self-efficacy can significantly predict academic performance. We suggest that interventions designed to enhance motivation towards studying for undergraduate dissertation should focus on enhancing self-efficacy.
Type: Article
Language: en
Description: The rights to this article are held by the Journal of Hospitality, Leisure, Sports and Tourism Education, an Open Access e-journal. The full text can be accessed at the link given above.
Keywords: Self-efficacy
Dissertation performance
Undergraduate students
Sports studies
ISSN: 1473-8376
Appears in Collections: Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group
Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

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