What do we mean by student support? Staff and students’ perspectives of the provision and effectiveness of support for students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/7596
Title:
What do we mean by student support? Staff and students’ perspectives of the provision and effectiveness of support for students
Authors:
Dhillon, Jaswinder; McGowan, Mhairi; Wang, Hong
Abstract:
The aim of this small-scale study is to explore the effectiveness of the support available to students registered for programmes of study in the School of Education. This includes the provision of university-wide student support and guidance services as well as the more localised study skills and academic and personal support provided by personal tutors. The perceptions of both staff and students were sampled through questionnaires and interviews. This paper presents a review of literature on the provision of student support for the increasingly diverse body of students in higher education and some preliminary findings from our survey of current students. The literature and findings from our investigation indicate discrepancies between the officially declared provision of student support services and the accessibility and use of these services in practice. There is ambiguity around the role of the personal tutor and inconsistency of practice in the level of support provided by ‘personal tutors’ which suggest that a review of the personal tutor role is needed. Student responses to our questionnaire also indicate that drop-in study skills provision in useful and being used but that other student support services, such as careers and counselling services are rarely used by students from the School of Education. This is mainly due to accessibility of these services and the lack of provision on the Walsall campus. The other major theme in the data is the process of induction to the University which students regard as being too intensive an ‘event’ and inappropriate for getting to know about support services.
Citation:
CELT Learning and Teaching Projects 2005/2006
Publisher:
University of Wolverhampton
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/7596
Additional Links:
http://www.wlv.ac.uk/celt
Submitted date:
2007-01-17
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This article was first published in the Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses (WIRE). There is no printed version.
Appears in Collections:
Institute for Learning Enhancement (ILE); Learning and Teaching in Higher Education

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDhillon, Jaswinder-
dc.contributor.authorMcGowan, Mhairi-
dc.contributor.authorWang, Hong-
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-17T15:20:00Z-
dc.date.available2007-01-17T15:20:00Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.date.submitted2007-01-17-
dc.identifier.citationCELT Learning and Teaching Projects 2005/2006en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/7596-
dc.descriptionThis article was first published in the Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses (WIRE). There is no printed version.en
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this small-scale study is to explore the effectiveness of the support available to students registered for programmes of study in the School of Education. This includes the provision of university-wide student support and guidance services as well as the more localised study skills and academic and personal support provided by personal tutors. The perceptions of both staff and students were sampled through questionnaires and interviews. This paper presents a review of literature on the provision of student support for the increasingly diverse body of students in higher education and some preliminary findings from our survey of current students. The literature and findings from our investigation indicate discrepancies between the officially declared provision of student support services and the accessibility and use of these services in practice. There is ambiguity around the role of the personal tutor and inconsistency of practice in the level of support provided by ‘personal tutors’ which suggest that a review of the personal tutor role is needed. Student responses to our questionnaire also indicate that drop-in study skills provision in useful and being used but that other student support services, such as careers and counselling services are rarely used by students from the School of Education. This is mainly due to accessibility of these services and the lack of provision on the Walsall campus. The other major theme in the data is the process of induction to the University which students regard as being too intensive an ‘event’ and inappropriate for getting to know about support services.en
dc.format.extent60976 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.wlv.ac.uk/celten
dc.subjectStudentsen
dc.subjectUndergraduate studentsen
dc.subjectStudy skillsen
dc.subjectRetentionen
dc.subjectHigher education-
dc.subjectSupportive learning environments-
dc.titleWhat do we mean by student support? Staff and students’ perspectives of the provision and effectiveness of support for studentsen
dc.typeArticleen
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