2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/7217
Title:
Anthropometric factors affecting vertical jump height in ballet dancers
Authors:
Wyon, Matthew A.; Allen, Nicolas; Angioi, Manuela; Nevill, Alan M.; Twitchett, Emily
Abstract:
Jumping plays an integral part of ballet performance and this study examines some of the ballet dancer’s characteristics that influence jump height. Forty-nine dancers (M = 21; F = 28) completed a series of tests that included two footed vertical jump height, single leg vertical jump height and anthropometric measurements. Supplemental training history and company position were also recorded. Statistical analysis (ANCOVA and MANOVA) indicated males had a greater vertical jump height than females (p < 0.01) and soloist and first artists had significantly greater vertical jump height than principals and artists for both male and females (p < 0.05). Anthropometric data indicated males having significantly larger leg girths than females. Males and females had no significant bilateral differences in girth measurements though male artists had significantly smaller thighs and calves than the other seniority levels (p < 0.05). Supplemental training did not influence jump height in this study’s population though males carried out significantly more weight training (p < 0.01) and females more aerobic training (p < 0.05). When jump height was analyzed in relation to cross-sectional area of the calf and thigh, there was no gender difference (p > 0.05). These results corroborate to previous research and also provide greater insight on how anthropometric and choreographic factors potentially influence vertical jump height in ballet dancers. The ineffective influence of supplemental training on vertical jump height needs greater examination. How other training regimens could influence jump height in dancers needs to be examined.
Citation:
Journal of Dance Medicine & Science, 10(3/4): 106-110
Publisher:
International Association for Dance Medicine and Science
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/7217
Additional Links:
http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-165576495.html; http://direct.bl.uk/bld/PlaceOrder.do?UIN=200306994&ETOC=RN&from=searchengine
Submitted date:
2007-01-10
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1089-313X
Appears in Collections:
Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group; Dance Science; Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWyon, Matthew A.-
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Nicolas-
dc.contributor.authorAngioi, Manuela-
dc.contributor.authorNevill, Alan M.-
dc.contributor.authorTwitchett, Emily-
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-10T17:08:54Z-
dc.date.available2007-01-10T17:08:54Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.date.submitted2007-01-10-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Dance Medicine & Science, 10(3/4): 106-110en
dc.identifier.issn1089-313X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/7217-
dc.description.abstractJumping plays an integral part of ballet performance and this study examines some of the ballet dancer’s characteristics that influence jump height. Forty-nine dancers (M = 21; F = 28) completed a series of tests that included two footed vertical jump height, single leg vertical jump height and anthropometric measurements. Supplemental training history and company position were also recorded. Statistical analysis (ANCOVA and MANOVA) indicated males had a greater vertical jump height than females (p < 0.01) and soloist and first artists had significantly greater vertical jump height than principals and artists for both male and females (p < 0.05). Anthropometric data indicated males having significantly larger leg girths than females. Males and females had no significant bilateral differences in girth measurements though male artists had significantly smaller thighs and calves than the other seniority levels (p < 0.05). Supplemental training did not influence jump height in this study’s population though males carried out significantly more weight training (p < 0.01) and females more aerobic training (p < 0.05). When jump height was analyzed in relation to cross-sectional area of the calf and thigh, there was no gender difference (p > 0.05). These results corroborate to previous research and also provide greater insight on how anthropometric and choreographic factors potentially influence vertical jump height in ballet dancers. The ineffective influence of supplemental training on vertical jump height needs greater examination. How other training regimens could influence jump height in dancers needs to be examined.en
dc.format.extent333627 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInternational Association for Dance Medicine and Scienceen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-165576495.htmlen
dc.relation.urlhttp://direct.bl.uk/bld/PlaceOrder.do?UIN=200306994&ETOC=RN&from=searchengine-
dc.subjectJump heighten
dc.subjectBalleten
dc.subjectAnthropometric measurementsen
dc.subjectDance-
dc.titleAnthropometric factors affecting vertical jump height in ballet dancersen
dc.typeArticleen
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