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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Sport, Performing Arts and Leisure > Research Centre for Sport, Exercise and Performance > Dance Science > Anthropometric factors affecting vertical jump height in ballet dancers

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/7217
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Title: Anthropometric factors affecting vertical jump height in ballet dancers
Authors: Wyon, Matthew A.
Allen, Nicolas
Angioi, Manuela
Nevill, Alan M.
Twitchett, Emily
Citation: Journal of Dance Medicine & Science, 10(3/4): 106-110
Publisher: International Association for Dance Medicine and Science
Issue Date: 2006
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/7217
Additional Links: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-165576495.html
http://direct.bl.uk/bld/PlaceOrder.do?UIN=200306994&ETOC=RN&from=searchengine
Abstract: Jumping plays an integral part of ballet performance and this study examines some of the ballet dancer’s characteristics that influence jump height. Forty-nine dancers (M = 21; F = 28) completed a series of tests that included two footed vertical jump height, single leg vertical jump height and anthropometric measurements. Supplemental training history and company position were also recorded. Statistical analysis (ANCOVA and MANOVA) indicated males had a greater vertical jump height than females (p < 0.01) and soloist and first artists had significantly greater vertical jump height than principals and artists for both male and females (p < 0.05). Anthropometric data indicated males having significantly larger leg girths than females. Males and females had no significant bilateral differences in girth measurements though male artists had significantly smaller thighs and calves than the other seniority levels (p < 0.05). Supplemental training did not influence jump height in this study’s population though males carried out significantly more weight training (p < 0.01) and females more aerobic training (p < 0.05). When jump height was analyzed in relation to cross-sectional area of the calf and thigh, there was no gender difference (p > 0.05). These results corroborate to previous research and also provide greater insight on how anthropometric and choreographic factors potentially influence vertical jump height in ballet dancers. The ineffective influence of supplemental training on vertical jump height needs greater examination. How other training regimens could influence jump height in dancers needs to be examined.
Type: Article
Language: en
Keywords: Jump height
Ballet
Anthropometric measurements
Dance
ISSN: 1089-313X
Appears in Collections: Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group
Dance Science
Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

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