Hormonal factors in the development of differences in strength between boys and girls during adolescence: a longitudinal study.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/66083
Title:
Hormonal factors in the development of differences in strength between boys and girls during adolescence: a longitudinal study.
Authors:
Round, J. M.; Jones, David A.; Honour, J. W.; Nevill, Alan M.
Abstract:
The development of elbow flexor (biceps) and knee extensor (quadriceps) strength has been followed in a mixed longitudinal study of 50 boys and 50 girls from the age of 8 to 17 years. Sex differences in strength emerged at the time of peak height velocity and were especially marked for the biceps. Data for individual children were aligned to the time of peak height velocity and associations between strength, height, weight and circulating testosterone were investigated using multi-level modelling. The results show that, for girls, quadriceps strength is proportional to height and weight while for boys there is an additional factor which can be fully attributed to increasing levels of testosterone. Testosterone is important in explaining differences in biceps strength between the sexes but an additional factor is also required. It is suggested that, in addition to a direct effect on muscle, testosterone could have a second indirect action on biceps strength by promoting growth in length of the humerus as part of the general development of the male upper limb girdle.
Citation:
Annals of Human Biology, 26(1): 49-62
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis for the Society for the Study of Human Biology
Journal:
Annals of Human Biology
Issue Date:
1999
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/66083
PubMed ID:
9974083
Additional Links:
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/apl/tahb/1999/00000026/00000001/art00005
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0301-4460
Appears in Collections:
Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group; Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRound, J. M.-
dc.contributor.authorJones, David A.-
dc.contributor.authorHonour, J. W.-
dc.contributor.authorNevill, Alan M.-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-23T20:08:20Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-23T20:08:20Z-
dc.date.issued1999-
dc.identifier.citationAnnals of Human Biology, 26(1): 49-62en
dc.identifier.issn0301-4460-
dc.identifier.pmid9974083-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/66083-
dc.description.abstractThe development of elbow flexor (biceps) and knee extensor (quadriceps) strength has been followed in a mixed longitudinal study of 50 boys and 50 girls from the age of 8 to 17 years. Sex differences in strength emerged at the time of peak height velocity and were especially marked for the biceps. Data for individual children were aligned to the time of peak height velocity and associations between strength, height, weight and circulating testosterone were investigated using multi-level modelling. The results show that, for girls, quadriceps strength is proportional to height and weight while for boys there is an additional factor which can be fully attributed to increasing levels of testosterone. Testosterone is important in explaining differences in biceps strength between the sexes but an additional factor is also required. It is suggested that, in addition to a direct effect on muscle, testosterone could have a second indirect action on biceps strength by promoting growth in length of the humerus as part of the general development of the male upper limb girdle.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis for the Society for the Study of Human Biologyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/apl/tahb/1999/00000026/00000001/art00005en
dc.subjectMuscle Strengthen
dc.subjectMuscular systemen
dc.subjectSports Medicineen
dc.subjectKneeen
dc.subjectElbowen
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAlkaline Phosphataseen
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshEstradiolen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHormonesen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshInsulin-Like Growth Factor Ien
dc.subject.meshLongitudinal Studiesen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMuscle Contractionen
dc.subject.meshTestosteroneen
dc.titleHormonal factors in the development of differences in strength between boys and girls during adolescence: a longitudinal study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalAnnals of Human Biologyen

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