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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Sport, Performing Arts and Leisure > Research Centre for Sport, Exercise and Performance > Sport Performance > Evidence of nationalistic bias in MuayThai

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/65973
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Title: Evidence of nationalistic bias in MuayThai
Authors: Myers, Tony D.
Balmer, Nigel J.
Nevill, Alan M.
Al-Nakeeb, Yahya
Citation: Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 5(CSSI): 21-27
Publisher: Asist Group
Journal: Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
Issue Date: 2006
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/65973
Additional Links: http://www.jssm.org/combat/1/4/v5combat-4text.php
Abstract: MuayThai is a combat sport with a growing international profile but limited research conducted into judging practices and processes. Problems with judging of other subjectively judged combat sports have caused controversy at major international tournaments that have resulted in changes to scoring methods. Nationalistic bias has been central to these problems and has been identified across a range of sports. The aim of this study was to examine nationalistic bias in MuayThai. Data were collected from the International Federation of MuayThai Amateur (IFMA) World Championships held in Almaty, Kazakhstan September 2003 and comprised of tournament results from 70 A-class MuayThai bouts each judged by between five and nine judges. Bouts examined featured 62 competitors from 21 countries and 25 judges from 11 countries. Results suggested that nationalistic bias was evident. The bias observed equated to approximately one round difference between opposing judges over the course of a bout (a mean of 1.09 (SE=0.50) points difference between judges with opposing affilations). The number of neutral judges used meant that this level of bias generally did not influence the outcome of bouts. Future research should explore other ingroup biases, such as nearest neighbour bias and political bias as well as investigating the feasibility adopting an electronic scoring system.
Type: Article
Language: en
Keywords: MuayThai
Judging
bias
Sporting events
Combat sports
Nationalistic bias
Thailand
Scoring
Home advantage
ISSN: 1303-2968
Appears in Collections: Sport Performance
Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

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