University of Wolverhampton
Browse
Collection All
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
Listed communities
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet

Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Sport, Performing Arts and Leisure > Research Centre for Sport, Exercise and Performance > Sport Performance > Sleep profiles and mood state changes during an expedition to the South Pole: a case study of a female explorer.

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/65953
    Del.icio.us     LinkedIn     Citeulike     Connotea     Facebook     Stumble it!



Title: Sleep profiles and mood state changes during an expedition to the South Pole: a case study of a female explorer.
Authors: Pedlar, Charles R.
Lane, Andrew M.
Lloyd, Juliette C.
Dawson, Jean
Emegbo, Stephen
Whyte, Gregory P.
Stanely, Neil
Citation: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine, 18(2): 127-132
Publisher: Wilderness Medical Society
Journal: Wilderness and Environmental Medicine
Issue Date: 2007
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/65953
DOI: 10.1580/06-WEME-BR-039R1.1
Additional Links: http://www.wemjournal.org/wmsonline/?request=get-document&issn=1080-6032&volume=018&issue=02&page=0127
Abstract: Objectives: To investigate sleep parameters and mood profiles of a female explorer traveling solo and unaided to the South Pole during the winter. Methods: During the 44-day expedition, global activity and sleep were assessed using a wrist actigraph (AW) worn on the non-dominant wrist. Mood was assessed using an adapted Profile of Mood States questionnaire. Pre- and post- expedition physiological profiles were conducted to assess body composition, strength and power and aerobic capacity. Results: The AW data revealed decreasing sleep duration throughout the expedition, with an average sleep time of 5 hours (range: 8hr 14mins – 1hr 42mins), with sleep times consistently below 3 hours during the final third of the expedition. Mood responses indicated a progressive reduction in vigour and increase in fatigue. Sleep time was positively related to vigour and inversely related to depression and fatigue, a finding that is consistent with the notion that positive feelings (high vigour and low fatigue) are linked with sleep. Conclusions: This account provides insight to help understand the limits of human tolerance and may be directly applicable when planning future expeditions of this nature.
Type: Article
Language: en
Keywords: sleep
mood change
emotion
endurance
fatigue
extreme environment
polar expedition
Humans
wrist actigraph
ISSN: 10806032
Appears in Collections: Sport Performance

Files in This Item:
File Description Size Format View/Open
pedlar 2007(1).doc141KbUnknownView/Open
pedlar wire.pdf72KbAdobe PDFThumbnail
View/Open

All Items in WIRE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

Fairtrade - Guarantees a better deal for Third World Producers

University of Wolverhampton, Wulfruna Street, Wolverhampton, WV1 1LY

Course enquiries: 0800 953 3222, General enquiries: 01902 321000,
Email: enquiries@wlv.ac.uk | Freedom of Information | Disclaimer and copyright | Website feedback | The University as a charity

OR Logo Powered by Open Repository | Cookies