University of Wolverhampton
Browse
Collection All
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
Listed communities
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet

Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Health & Wellbeing > Centre for Health and Social Care Improvement > Foetal origins theory: links with adult depression and general self-efficacy.

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/6330
    Del.icio.us     LinkedIn     Citeulike     Connotea     Facebook     Stumble it!



Title: Foetal origins theory: links with adult depression and general self-efficacy.
Authors: Bellingham-Young, Denise
Adamson-Macedo, Elvidina N.
Citation: Neuroendocrinology Letters, 24(6): 412-416
Publisher: National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health
Issue Date: 2003
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/6330
PubMed ID: 15073566
Additional Links: http://www.nel.edu/home.htm
Abstract: Foetal origins theory has suggested that early environment can affect vulnerability to major diseases in later life. Recent research also suggests that foetal hormonal programming may influence neurotransmitter and hormone levels affecting adult psychological states (i.e. depression and general self-efficacy). However, investigations into early environment and depression have focused on hospitalised or elderly participants, using non-standard measures. This study investigates links between birthweight and depression in a non clinical adult population, as well as links with general self-efficacy and depression. METHODS: This is a retrospective design. 100 participants mean age 25.9 self reported birthweight, current height and weight to allow computation of BMI. A General Self-Efficacy Scale and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were also completed. The official classification of low birthweight (2.5 kg) and the median weight for the group (3.26 kg) were used to identify three groups. FINDINGS: One way ANOVA showed that variance in depression [F = 5.31, (2,97) p =.006] and lower general self-efficacy [F = 4.04, (2,96) p =.021] is explained by membership of birthweight group. There was no variance between depression and age, although general self-efficacy did increase with age [F = 6.13, (2,95) p =.003). There was no significant variance between BMI and birthweight or depression. DISCUSSION: Findings add to the growing body of research suggesting that foetal environment influences later life, particularly that early programming may affect hormone and neurotransmitter secretions which may influence later life psychological as well as physical health.
Type: Article
Language: en
Keywords: Foetal origins
Depression
Post-natal depression
Early environment
ISSN: 0172-780X
Appears in Collections: Centre for Health and Social Care Improvement

Files in This Item:
File Description Size Format View/Open
Adamson-Macedo4.pdf183KbAdobe PDFThumbnail
View/Open

Related articles on PubMed
bullet
[Link between depression and academic self-esteem in gifted children].
Bénony H, Van Der Elst D, Chahraoui K, Bénony C, Marnier JP
2007 Jan-Feb
bullet
bullet
Prematurity and adult minor illness.
Bellingham-Young DA, Adamson-Macedo EN
2004 Dec
bullet
bullet
A pilot study of mind-body changes in adults with asthma who practice mental imagery.
Epstein GN, Halper JP, Barrett EA, Birdsall C, McGee M, Baron KP, Lowenstein S
2004 Jul-Aug
See all 90 articles

All Items in WIRE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

Fairtrade - Guarantees a better deal for Third World Producers

University of Wolverhampton, Wulfruna Street, Wolverhampton, WV1 1LY

Course enquiries: 0800 953 3222, General enquiries: 01902 321000,
Email: enquiries@wlv.ac.uk | Freedom of Information | Disclaimer and copyright | Website feedback | The University as a charity

OR Logo Powered by Open Repository | Cookies