3.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/621048
Title:
Teaching in Emergency Medicine
Authors:
Matheson, David ( 0000-0002-3695-3167 )
Abstract:
Teaching is that rare thing among occupations in that it is one that everyone has experienced in one form or another. Most medical practitioners and other healthcare professionals in emergency medicine have attended school, generally for 12 or more years and all will have undergone further training, whether in medicine, nursing, physiotherapy or whatever. They will have encountered a diversity of teachers; have been impressed by some and perhaps depressed by others. Because being taught is such a universal experience, the myth persists in many places that just because an individual is an expert in a subject that s/he can teach it. Good teachers frequently demonstrate the skill of making the complex accessible. They may demonstrate this in all manners of style but they will always do so in a way that makes the learner feel that this material is open to the likes of them, whoever or whatever that may be. A lasting impact of these skillful performances is that the learner may be left with the impression that teaching is easy. The good teacher teaches with ease and it is easy to lose sight, or never to see at all, the level of skill, attentiveness and empathy that good teaching demands. However, to claim that one can teach a topic just because one has been taught the topic is akin to saying that one can treat disease as a result of having been ill. In my own country, the UK, it is generally clinically-related research which carries value and teaching is assumed to be doable by anyone. A light on the horizon is the increasing demands from the UK General Medical Council that those who teach medical students and residents be able to teach and that they have some training.
Publisher:
Austin Publishing Group
Journal:
Austin Emergency Medicine
Issue Date:
Mar-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/621048
Additional Links:
http://austinpublishinggroup.com/index.php
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2473-0653
Appears in Collections:
FEHW

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMatheson, Daviden
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-30T10:38:25Z-
dc.date.available2018-01-30T10:38:25Z-
dc.date.issued2016-03-
dc.identifier.issn2473-0653-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/621048-
dc.description.abstractTeaching is that rare thing among occupations in that it is one that everyone has experienced in one form or another. Most medical practitioners and other healthcare professionals in emergency medicine have attended school, generally for 12 or more years and all will have undergone further training, whether in medicine, nursing, physiotherapy or whatever. They will have encountered a diversity of teachers; have been impressed by some and perhaps depressed by others. Because being taught is such a universal experience, the myth persists in many places that just because an individual is an expert in a subject that s/he can teach it. Good teachers frequently demonstrate the skill of making the complex accessible. They may demonstrate this in all manners of style but they will always do so in a way that makes the learner feel that this material is open to the likes of them, whoever or whatever that may be. A lasting impact of these skillful performances is that the learner may be left with the impression that teaching is easy. The good teacher teaches with ease and it is easy to lose sight, or never to see at all, the level of skill, attentiveness and empathy that good teaching demands. However, to claim that one can teach a topic just because one has been taught the topic is akin to saying that one can treat disease as a result of having been ill. In my own country, the UK, it is generally clinically-related research which carries value and teaching is assumed to be doable by anyone. A light on the horizon is the increasing demands from the UK General Medical Council that those who teach medical students and residents be able to teach and that they have some training.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAustin Publishing Groupen
dc.relation.urlhttp://austinpublishinggroup.com/index.phpen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectemergency medicineen
dc.subjectmedical education and trainingen
dc.titleTeaching in Emergency Medicineen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalAustin Emergency Medicineen
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