A Critical Minefield: the Haunting of the Welsh Working Class Novel

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620996
Title:
A Critical Minefield: the Haunting of the Welsh Working Class Novel
Authors:
Byrne, Aidan ( 0000-0001-5499-9794 ) ; Sheppard, Lisa
Abstract:
A History of British Working-Class Literature examines the rich contributions of working-class writers in Great Britain from 1700 to the present. Since the early eighteenth century the phenomenon of working-class writing has been recognised, but almost invariably co-opted in some ultimately distorting manner, whether as examples of 'natural genius'; a Victorian self-improvement ethic; or as an aspect of the heroic workers of nineteenth- and twentieth-century radical culture. The present work contrastingly applies a wide variety of interpretive approaches to this literature. Essays on more familiar topics, such as the 'agrarian idyll' of John Clare, are mixed with entirely new areas in the field like working-class women's 'life-narratives'. This authoritative and comprehensive History explores a wide range of genres such as travel writing, the verse-epistle, the elegy and novels, while covering aspects of Welsh, Scottish, Ulster/Irish culture and transatlantic perspectives.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Journal:
A History of British Working Class Literature
Issue Date:
2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620996
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
ISBN:
978-1107190405
Appears in Collections:
FOA

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorByrne, Aidanen
dc.contributor.authorSheppard, Lisaen
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-13T14:34:26Z-
dc.date.available2017-12-13T14:34:26Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.isbn978-1107190405-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620996-
dc.description.abstractA History of British Working-Class Literature examines the rich contributions of working-class writers in Great Britain from 1700 to the present. Since the early eighteenth century the phenomenon of working-class writing has been recognised, but almost invariably co-opted in some ultimately distorting manner, whether as examples of 'natural genius'; a Victorian self-improvement ethic; or as an aspect of the heroic workers of nineteenth- and twentieth-century radical culture. The present work contrastingly applies a wide variety of interpretive approaches to this literature. Essays on more familiar topics, such as the 'agrarian idyll' of John Clare, are mixed with entirely new areas in the field like working-class women's 'life-narratives'. This authoritative and comprehensive History explores a wide range of genres such as travel writing, the verse-epistle, the elegy and novels, while covering aspects of Welsh, Scottish, Ulster/Irish culture and transatlantic perspectives.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen
dc.subjectWalesen
dc.subjectCymruen
dc.subjectllenyddiaethen
dc.subjectcymraegen
dc.subjectliteratureen
dc.subjectworking classen
dc.subjectclassen
dc.subjectWelsh writing in Englishen
dc.titleA Critical Minefield: the Haunting of the Welsh Working Class Novelen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.identifier.journalA History of British Working Class Literatureen
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