South Asian Children Have Increased Body Fat in Comparison to White Children at the Same Body Mass Index.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620966
Title:
South Asian Children Have Increased Body Fat in Comparison to White Children at the Same Body Mass Index.
Authors:
Eyre, Emma L J; Duncan, Michael J; Nevill, Alan M.
Abstract:
The ability of body mass index (BMI) to predict excess fat in South Asian children is unknown. This cross-sectional study examines the influence of ethnicity on body fatness in children. Weight status and body fat were determined using BMI, waist circumference (WC), two skinfold sites (SF; triceps and subscapula) and leg-to-leg bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA; Tanita BF350, Tanita, Tokyo, Japan) in 194 children aged 8.47 ± 0.50 years from Coventry, United Kingdom. Biological maturity was also determined. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) identified significant differences between ethnic (p < 0.001) and gender groups' BMI (p = 0.026), with a significant covariate for skinfold (p < 0.001) and bioelectrical impedance (p < 0.001). For a given body fat value, South Asian children and females had a lower BMI value (-1.12 kg/m², p < 0.001 and -0.50 kg/m², p = 0.026, respectively, when adjusted for SF; -1.56 kg/m², p < 0.001 and -0.31 kg/m², p = 0.16, respectively, when adjusted for BIA) compared with white children and boys. The prediction model including ethnicity, gender and BIA explained 80.4% of the variance in BMI. Maturation was not found to be a significant covariate (p > 0.05). To conclude, the findings suggest that BMI cut-points may need to be lowered in South Asian children, and thus age-by-sex-by-ethnicity specific BMI cut-points are needed in children. Further research examining body composition with health parameters in this population is needed.
Citation:
South Asian Children Have Increased Body Fat in Comparison to White Children at the Same Body Mass Index. 2017, 4 (11) Children (Basel)
Publisher:
MDPI
Journal:
Children (Basel, Switzerland)
Issue Date:
22-Nov-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620966
DOI:
10.3390/children4110102
PubMed ID:
29165375
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2227-9067
Appears in Collections:
Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorEyre, Emma L Jen
dc.contributor.authorDuncan, Michael Jen
dc.contributor.authorNevill, Alan M.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-07T15:17:24Z-
dc.date.available2017-12-07T15:17:24Z-
dc.date.issued2017-11-22-
dc.identifier.citationSouth Asian Children Have Increased Body Fat in Comparison to White Children at the Same Body Mass Index. 2017, 4 (11) Children (Basel)en
dc.identifier.issn2227-9067en
dc.identifier.pmid29165375-
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/children4110102-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620966-
dc.description.abstractThe ability of body mass index (BMI) to predict excess fat in South Asian children is unknown. This cross-sectional study examines the influence of ethnicity on body fatness in children. Weight status and body fat were determined using BMI, waist circumference (WC), two skinfold sites (SF; triceps and subscapula) and leg-to-leg bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA; Tanita BF350, Tanita, Tokyo, Japan) in 194 children aged 8.47 ± 0.50 years from Coventry, United Kingdom. Biological maturity was also determined. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) identified significant differences between ethnic (p < 0.001) and gender groups' BMI (p = 0.026), with a significant covariate for skinfold (p < 0.001) and bioelectrical impedance (p < 0.001). For a given body fat value, South Asian children and females had a lower BMI value (-1.12 kg/m², p < 0.001 and -0.50 kg/m², p = 0.026, respectively, when adjusted for SF; -1.56 kg/m², p < 0.001 and -0.31 kg/m², p = 0.16, respectively, when adjusted for BIA) compared with white children and boys. The prediction model including ethnicity, gender and BIA explained 80.4% of the variance in BMI. Maturation was not found to be a significant covariate (p > 0.05). To conclude, the findings suggest that BMI cut-points may need to be lowered in South Asian children, and thus age-by-sex-by-ethnicity specific BMI cut-points are needed in children. Further research examining body composition with health parameters in this population is needed.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMDPIen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Children (Basel, Switzerland)en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectadiposityen
dc.subjectethnicityen
dc.subjectobesityen
dc.subjectsubcutaneous faten
dc.subjectyouthen
dc.titleSouth Asian Children Have Increased Body Fat in Comparison to White Children at the Same Body Mass Index.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalChildren (Basel, Switzerland)en
dc.date.accepted2017-11-14-
rioxxterms.funderinternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUOW071217ANen
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-12-07en
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