Individual Differences in Gelotophobia Predict Responses to Joy and Contempt

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620901
Title:
Individual Differences in Gelotophobia Predict Responses to Joy and Contempt
Authors:
Hofmann, J.; Platt, T.; Ruch, W.; Proyer, R. T.
Abstract:
In a paradigm facilitating smile misattribution, facial responses and ratings to contempt and joy were investigated in individuals with or without gelotophobia (fear of being laughed at). Participants from two independent samples (N1 = 83, N2 = 50) rated the intensity of eight emotions in 16 photos depicting joy, contempt, and different smiles. Facial responses were coded by the Facial Action Coding System in the second study. Compared with non-fearful individuals, gelotophobes rated joy smiles as less joyful and more contemptuous. Moreover, gelotophobes showed less facial joy and more contempt markers. The contempt ratings were comparable between the two groups. Looking at the photos of smiles lifted the positive mood of non-gelotophobes, whereas gelotophobes did not experience an increase. We hypothesize that the interpretation bias of “joyful faces hiding evil minds” (i.e., being also contemptuous) and exhibiting less joy facially may complicate social interactions for gelotophobes and serve as a maintaining factor of gelotophobia.
Citation:
Individual Differences in Gelotophobia Predict Responses to Joy and Contempt 2015, 5 (2) SAGE Open
Publisher:
Sage
Journal:
SAGE Open
Issue Date:
13-Apr-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620901
DOI:
10.1177/2158244015581191
Additional Links:
http://sgo.sagepub.com/lookup/doi/10.1177/2158244015581191
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2158-2440
Sponsors:
The research leading to these results has received funding from a research grant from the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF; 100014_126967-1)
Appears in Collections:
FEHW

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHofmann, J.en
dc.contributor.authorPlatt, T.en
dc.contributor.authorRuch, W.en
dc.contributor.authorProyer, R. T.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-27T16:53:54Z-
dc.date.available2017-11-27T16:53:54Z-
dc.date.issued2015-04-13-
dc.identifier.citationIndividual Differences in Gelotophobia Predict Responses to Joy and Contempt 2015, 5 (2) SAGE Openen
dc.identifier.issn2158-2440-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/2158244015581191-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620901-
dc.description.abstractIn a paradigm facilitating smile misattribution, facial responses and ratings to contempt and joy were investigated in individuals with or without gelotophobia (fear of being laughed at). Participants from two independent samples (N1 = 83, N2 = 50) rated the intensity of eight emotions in 16 photos depicting joy, contempt, and different smiles. Facial responses were coded by the Facial Action Coding System in the second study. Compared with non-fearful individuals, gelotophobes rated joy smiles as less joyful and more contemptuous. Moreover, gelotophobes showed less facial joy and more contempt markers. The contempt ratings were comparable between the two groups. Looking at the photos of smiles lifted the positive mood of non-gelotophobes, whereas gelotophobes did not experience an increase. We hypothesize that the interpretation bias of “joyful faces hiding evil minds” (i.e., being also contemptuous) and exhibiting less joy facially may complicate social interactions for gelotophobes and serve as a maintaining factor of gelotophobia.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe research leading to these results has received funding from a research grant from the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF; 100014_126967-1)en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSageen
dc.relation.urlhttp://sgo.sagepub.com/lookup/doi/10.1177/2158244015581191en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to SAGE Openen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectgelotophobiaen
dc.subjectjoyen
dc.subjectlaughteren
dc.subjectsmilingen
dc.titleIndividual Differences in Gelotophobia Predict Responses to Joy and Contempten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalSAGE Openen
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