Adaptation, evolution and survival? The political economy of Whitleyism and public service industrial relations in the U.K. 1917–present

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620878
Title:
Adaptation, evolution and survival? The political economy of Whitleyism and public service industrial relations in the U.K. 1917–present
Authors:
Gill-McLure, Whyeda
Abstract:
The Whitley Reports, 1917, were seen by contemporaries as conservative: they reflected pre-existing voluntaristic approaches to the labour problem rather than a radical departure. Largely neglected by the well-established private sector, for whom they were intended, Whitley Councils were taken up by the newly emerging public service unions. The inter-war years demonstrated Whitleyism’s lack of clout. But, endorsed by governments during and after the Second World War, public sector Whitleyism came to embody the tenets of progressive public administration by providing nationally determined pay, career progression and a public service ethos. These hard-won union gains are under attack from neo-liberal reforms that attempt to model public service labour relations on the private sector. The paper examines the major weaknesses and strengths of the Whitley model for managing public service industrial relations through an analysis of a century of Whitleyism.
Citation:
Adaptation, evolution and survival? The political economy of Whitleyism and public service industrial relations in the U.K. 1917–present 2017, 59 (1):15 Labor History
Publisher:
Routledge
Journal:
Labor History
Issue Date:
26-Oct-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620878
DOI:
10.1080/0023656X.2017.1375579
Additional Links:
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0023656X.2017.1375579
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0023-656X
Appears in Collections:
FOSS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGill-McLure, Whyedaen
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-21T14:30:15Z-
dc.date.available2017-11-21T14:30:15Z-
dc.date.issued2017-10-26-
dc.identifier.citationAdaptation, evolution and survival? The political economy of Whitleyism and public service industrial relations in the U.K. 1917–present 2017, 59 (1):15 Labor Historyen
dc.identifier.issn0023-656Xen
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/0023656X.2017.1375579-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620878-
dc.description.abstractThe Whitley Reports, 1917, were seen by contemporaries as conservative: they reflected pre-existing voluntaristic approaches to the labour problem rather than a radical departure. Largely neglected by the well-established private sector, for whom they were intended, Whitley Councils were taken up by the newly emerging public service unions. The inter-war years demonstrated Whitleyism’s lack of clout. But, endorsed by governments during and after the Second World War, public sector Whitleyism came to embody the tenets of progressive public administration by providing nationally determined pay, career progression and a public service ethos. These hard-won union gains are under attack from neo-liberal reforms that attempt to model public service labour relations on the private sector. The paper examines the major weaknesses and strengths of the Whitley model for managing public service industrial relations through an analysis of a century of Whitleyism.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0023656X.2017.1375579en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Labor Historyen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectPublic Service Unionsen
dc.subjectCollective Bargainingen
dc.subjectNew Public Managementen
dc.subjectPay Determinationen
dc.subjectPerformance Managementen
dc.subjectAusterityen
dc.titleAdaptation, evolution and survival? The political economy of Whitleyism and public service industrial relations in the U.K. 1917–presenten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalLabor Historyen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Human Resources & Leadership, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK-
dc.date.accepted2017-08-
rioxxterms.funderInternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW211117WGMen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-04-25en
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