Shift-Life Interactive Art: Mixed-Reality Artificial Ecosystem Simulation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620790
Title:
Shift-Life Interactive Art: Mixed-Reality Artificial Ecosystem Simulation
Authors:
Ch'ng, Eugene; Moore, Samantha ( 0000-0001-5646-4777 ) ; Harrison, Dew ( 0000-0003-4002-0113 )
Abstract:
This article presents a detailed design, development and implementation of a Mixed Reality Art-Science collaboration project which was exhibited during Darwin’s bicentenary exhibition at Shrewsbury, England. As an artist-led project the concerns of the artist were paramount, and this article presents Shift-Life as part of an on-going exploration into the parallels between the non-linear human thinking process and computation using semantic association to link items into ideas, and ideas into holistic concepts. Our art explores perceptions and states of mind as we move our attention between the simulated world of the computer and the real-world we inhabit, which means that any viewer engagement is participatory rather than passive. From a Mixed Reality point of view, the lead author intends to explore the convergence of the physical and virtual, therefore the formalization of the Mixed Reality system, focusing on the integration of artificial life, ecology, physical sensors and participant interaction through an interface of physical props. It is common for digital media artists to allow viewers to activate a work either through a computer screen via direct keyboard or mouse manipulation, or through immersive means to activate their work, for “Shift-Life” the artist was concerned with a direct “relational” approach where viewers would intuitively engage with the installation’s everyday objects, and with each other, to fully experience the piece. The Mixed Reality system is mediated via physical environmental sensors, which affect the virtual environment and autonomous agents, which in turn reacts and is expressed as virtual pixels projected onto a physical surface. The tangible hands-on interface proved to be instinctive, attractive and informative on many levels, delivering a good example of collaboration between the Arts and Science.
Publisher:
MIT Press
Journal:
Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments 26-2, Special Issue on "Arts, Aesthetics, and Performance in VR and Telepresence"
Issue Date:
Apr-2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620790
Additional Links:
http://www.mitpressjournals.org/loi/pres
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1054-7460
Sponsors:
Arts Council England, Shrewsbury Museums Trust
Appears in Collections:
FOA

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCh'ng, Eugeneen
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Samanthaen
dc.contributor.authorHarrison, Dewen
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-19T09:39:37Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-19T09:39:37Z-
dc.date.issued2018-04-
dc.identifier.issn1054-7460en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620790-
dc.description.abstractThis article presents a detailed design, development and implementation of a Mixed Reality Art-Science collaboration project which was exhibited during Darwin’s bicentenary exhibition at Shrewsbury, England. As an artist-led project the concerns of the artist were paramount, and this article presents Shift-Life as part of an on-going exploration into the parallels between the non-linear human thinking process and computation using semantic association to link items into ideas, and ideas into holistic concepts. Our art explores perceptions and states of mind as we move our attention between the simulated world of the computer and the real-world we inhabit, which means that any viewer engagement is participatory rather than passive. From a Mixed Reality point of view, the lead author intends to explore the convergence of the physical and virtual, therefore the formalization of the Mixed Reality system, focusing on the integration of artificial life, ecology, physical sensors and participant interaction through an interface of physical props. It is common for digital media artists to allow viewers to activate a work either through a computer screen via direct keyboard or mouse manipulation, or through immersive means to activate their work, for “Shift-Life” the artist was concerned with a direct “relational” approach where viewers would intuitively engage with the installation’s everyday objects, and with each other, to fully experience the piece. The Mixed Reality system is mediated via physical environmental sensors, which affect the virtual environment and autonomous agents, which in turn reacts and is expressed as virtual pixels projected onto a physical surface. The tangible hands-on interface proved to be instinctive, attractive and informative on many levels, delivering a good example of collaboration between the Arts and Science.en
dc.description.sponsorshipArts Council England, Shrewsbury Museums Trusten
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMIT Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.mitpressjournals.org/loi/presen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectmixed realityen
dc.subjectartificial lifeen
dc.subjectagent-based modelingen
dc.subjectarten
dc.subjectparticipatoryen
dc.subjectsensorsen
dc.titleShift-Life Interactive Art: Mixed-Reality Artificial Ecosystem Simulationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalPresence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments 26-2, Special Issue on "Arts, Aesthetics, and Performance in VR and Telepresence"en
dc.date.accepted2017-07-
rioxxterms.funderArts Council England, Shrewsbury Museums Trusten
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW191017DHen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-08-01en
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