Individual differences in gelotophobia and responses to laughter-eliciting emotions

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620782
Title:
Individual differences in gelotophobia and responses to laughter-eliciting emotions
Authors:
Ruch, Willibald; Hofmann, Jennifer; Platt, Tracey
Abstract:
Gelotophobes (individuals with a fear of being laughed at) have even been found to express less joy and more contempt towards joyfully smiling/laughing faces compared to non-gelotophobes. However, it is unclear whether the lower levels of joy and higher levels of contempt are related to joy per se or only to those elements of joy associated with laughter. Thus, this study investigated the verbal and facial responses of 20 gelotophobes and 20 non-gelotophobes towards videos of people recalling memories of laughter-eliciting positive emotions (amusement, relief, schadenfreude, tactile pleasure). The facial expressions of the participants were clandestinely filmed and evaluated by the Facial Action Coding System (FACS; Ekman, Friesen, & Hager, 2002). Smiles of enjoyment and “markers of contempt” were coded and verbal ratings of the participants obtained. Gelotophobes responded with less joyful smiles and with more expressions of contempt to laughter-eliciting emotions than did non-gelotophobes. Gelotophobes also rated the degree of joy expressed by participants in the video clips of tactile pleasure and relief lower than non-gelotophobes. No differences occurred in ratings of aversiveness. The results suggest that gelotophobes have a negative bias towards laughter-eliciting situations stemming from different positive elicitors.
Citation:
Individual differences in gelotophobia and responses to laughter-eliciting emotions 2015, 72:117 Personality and Individual Differences
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Personality and Individual Differences
Issue Date:
Jan-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620782
DOI:
10.1016/j.paid.2014.08.034
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0191886914004796
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
01918869
Sponsors:
research grant of the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF; 100014_126967-1) given to Willibald Ruch and René T. Proyer, and the ILHAIRE project, European Union Seventh Framework Program (FP7/2007-2013), Grant agreement no. 270780.
Appears in Collections:
FEHW

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRuch, Willibalden
dc.contributor.authorHofmann, Jenniferen
dc.contributor.authorPlatt, Traceyen
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-18T09:22:04Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-18T09:22:04Z-
dc.date.issued2015-01-
dc.identifier.citationIndividual differences in gelotophobia and responses to laughter-eliciting emotions 2015, 72:117 Personality and Individual Differencesen
dc.identifier.issn01918869-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.paid.2014.08.034-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620782-
dc.description.abstractGelotophobes (individuals with a fear of being laughed at) have even been found to express less joy and more contempt towards joyfully smiling/laughing faces compared to non-gelotophobes. However, it is unclear whether the lower levels of joy and higher levels of contempt are related to joy per se or only to those elements of joy associated with laughter. Thus, this study investigated the verbal and facial responses of 20 gelotophobes and 20 non-gelotophobes towards videos of people recalling memories of laughter-eliciting positive emotions (amusement, relief, schadenfreude, tactile pleasure). The facial expressions of the participants were clandestinely filmed and evaluated by the Facial Action Coding System (FACS; Ekman, Friesen, & Hager, 2002). Smiles of enjoyment and “markers of contempt” were coded and verbal ratings of the participants obtained. Gelotophobes responded with less joyful smiles and with more expressions of contempt to laughter-eliciting emotions than did non-gelotophobes. Gelotophobes also rated the degree of joy expressed by participants in the video clips of tactile pleasure and relief lower than non-gelotophobes. No differences occurred in ratings of aversiveness. The results suggest that gelotophobes have a negative bias towards laughter-eliciting situations stemming from different positive elicitors.en
dc.description.sponsorshipresearch grant of the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF; 100014_126967-1) given to Willibald Ruch and René T. Proyer, and the ILHAIRE project, European Union Seventh Framework Program (FP7/2007-2013), Grant agreement no. 270780.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0191886914004796en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Personality and Individual Differencesen
dc.subjectGelotophobiaen
dc.subjectSmilingen
dc.subjectLaughteren
dc.subjectFACSen
dc.subjectPositive emotionsen
dc.titleIndividual differences in gelotophobia and responses to laughter-eliciting emotionsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalPersonality and Individual Differencesen
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