The health and well-being of children and young people who are looked after: Findings from a face-to-face survey in Glasgow

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620763
Title:
The health and well-being of children and young people who are looked after: Findings from a face-to-face survey in Glasgow
Authors:
Vincent, Sharon ( 0000-0003-1127-0172 ) ; Jopling, Michael ( 0000-0002-2720-5650 )
Abstract:
Evidence suggests children and young people who are looked after (LACYP) may have poorer health outcomes than children and young people in the general population, particularly in relation to mental health. This paper discusses findings from a survey of the health and well-being of LACYP in Glasgow. A structured questionnaire used in the 2010 Glasgow Schools Survey (GSS) was adapted and administered in face-to- face interviews with 130 young people aged 11–18 in 2014–2015 to investigate various aspects of health and well-being including physical activity, diet and sleep, smoking, alcohol and drugs, health feelings and worries, behaviours, attitudes and expectations. LACYP were more likely to report that they had tried drugs, slightly more likely to have scores indicating a high level of difficulties on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) and less likely to report that they ate fruit and vegetables, used active transport methods to get to school and expected to go on to further or higher education; however, reported rates of physical activity, smoking and drinking were similar. LACYP were less likely to report that they had engaged in antisocial behaviour, truancy or bullying or been exposed to environmental tobacco smoke, less likely to worry or have low self-esteem, and more likely to rate their health positively. There were some variations according to placement type. The findings of this study present a more positive picture of the health and well-being of LACYP in Glasgow than might have been expected but should be treated with caution due to small sample size. Further research is needed to identify differences in relation to placement type and to determine whether being looked after might be associated with improved health and well-being outcomes for some children and young people.
Citation:
The health and well-being of children and young people who are looked after: Findings from a face-to-face survey in Glasgow 2017 Health & Social Care in the Community
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Health & Social Care in the Community
Issue Date:
11-Sep-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620763
DOI:
10.1111/hsc.12500
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/hsc.12500
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0966-0410
Appears in Collections:
FEHW

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorVincent, Sharonen
dc.contributor.authorJopling, Michaelen
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-12T13:47:18Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-12T13:47:18Z-
dc.date.issued2017-09-11-
dc.identifier.citationThe health and well-being of children and young people who are looked after: Findings from a face-to-face survey in Glasgow 2017 Health & Social Care in the Communityen
dc.identifier.issn0966-0410en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/hsc.12500-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620763-
dc.description.abstractEvidence suggests children and young people who are looked after (LACYP) may have poorer health outcomes than children and young people in the general population, particularly in relation to mental health. This paper discusses findings from a survey of the health and well-being of LACYP in Glasgow. A structured questionnaire used in the 2010 Glasgow Schools Survey (GSS) was adapted and administered in face-to- face interviews with 130 young people aged 11–18 in 2014–2015 to investigate various aspects of health and well-being including physical activity, diet and sleep, smoking, alcohol and drugs, health feelings and worries, behaviours, attitudes and expectations. LACYP were more likely to report that they had tried drugs, slightly more likely to have scores indicating a high level of difficulties on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) and less likely to report that they ate fruit and vegetables, used active transport methods to get to school and expected to go on to further or higher education; however, reported rates of physical activity, smoking and drinking were similar. LACYP were less likely to report that they had engaged in antisocial behaviour, truancy or bullying or been exposed to environmental tobacco smoke, less likely to worry or have low self-esteem, and more likely to rate their health positively. There were some variations according to placement type. The findings of this study present a more positive picture of the health and well-being of LACYP in Glasgow than might have been expected but should be treated with caution due to small sample size. Further research is needed to identify differences in relation to placement type and to determine whether being looked after might be associated with improved health and well-being outcomes for some children and young people.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/hsc.12500en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Health & Social Care in the Communityen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectadolescent healthen
dc.subjecthealth behavioursen
dc.subjectlooked after childrenen
dc.subjectScotlanden
dc.subjectyoung peopleen
dc.titleThe health and well-being of children and young people who are looked after: Findings from a face-to-face survey in Glasgowen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalHealth & Social Care in the Communityen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Social Work and Communities; Faculty of Health and Life Sciences; Northumbria University; Newcastle UK-
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Social Work and Communities; Faculty of Health and Life Sciences; Northumbria University; Newcastle UK-
dc.date.accepted2017-08-
rioxxterms.funderInternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW121017MJen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-09-11en
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