Acoustic Heritage and Audio Creativity: the Creative Application of Sound in the Representation, Understanding and Experience of Past Environments

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620678
Title:
Acoustic Heritage and Audio Creativity: the Creative Application of Sound in the Representation, Understanding and Experience of Past Environments
Authors:
Murphy, Damian ( 0000-0002-6676-9459 ) ; Shelley, Simon; Foteinou, Aglaia; Brereton, Jude; Daffern, Helena
Abstract:
Acoustic Heritage is one aspect of archaeoacoustics, and refers more specifically to the quantifiable acoustic properties of buildings, sites and landscapes from our architectural and archaeological past, forming an important aspect of our intangible cultural heritage. Auralisation, the audio equivalent of 3D visualization, enables these acoustic properties, captured via the process of measurement and survey, or computer based modelling, to form the basis of an audio reconstruction and presentation of the studied space. This paper examines the application of auralisation and audio creativity as a means to explore our acoustic heritage, thereby diversifying and enhancing the toolset available to the digital heritage or humanities researcher. The Open Acoustic Impulse Response (OpenAIR) library is an online repository for acoustic impulse response and auralisation data, with a significant part having been gathered from a broad range of heritage sites. The methodology used to gather this acoustic data is discussed, together with the processes used in generating and calibrating a comparable computer model, and how the data generated might be analysed and presented. The creative use of this acoustic data is also considered, in the context of music production, mixed media artwork and audio for gaming. More specifically to digital heritage is how these data can be used to create new experiences of past environments, as information, interpretation, guide or artwork and ultimately help to articulate new research questions and explorations of our acoustic heritage.
Citation:
Acoustic Heritage and Audio Creativity: the Creative Application of Sound in the Representation, Understanding and Experience of Past Environments 2017 (44) Internet Archaeology
Publisher:
Council for British Archaeology
Journal:
Internet Archaeology
Issue Date:
5-Jun-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620678
DOI:
10.11141/ia.44.12
Additional Links:
http://intarch.ac.uk/journal/issue44/12/index.html
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1363-5387
Appears in Collections:
FOA

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Damianen
dc.contributor.authorShelley, Simonen
dc.contributor.authorFoteinou, Aglaiaen
dc.contributor.authorBrereton, Judeen
dc.contributor.authorDaffern, Helenaen
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-20T14:03:22Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-20T14:03:22Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-05-
dc.identifier.citationAcoustic Heritage and Audio Creativity: the Creative Application of Sound in the Representation, Understanding and Experience of Past Environments 2017 (44) Internet Archaeologyen
dc.identifier.issn1363-5387en
dc.identifier.doi10.11141/ia.44.12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620678-
dc.description.abstractAcoustic Heritage is one aspect of archaeoacoustics, and refers more specifically to the quantifiable acoustic properties of buildings, sites and landscapes from our architectural and archaeological past, forming an important aspect of our intangible cultural heritage. Auralisation, the audio equivalent of 3D visualization, enables these acoustic properties, captured via the process of measurement and survey, or computer based modelling, to form the basis of an audio reconstruction and presentation of the studied space. This paper examines the application of auralisation and audio creativity as a means to explore our acoustic heritage, thereby diversifying and enhancing the toolset available to the digital heritage or humanities researcher. The Open Acoustic Impulse Response (OpenAIR) library is an online repository for acoustic impulse response and auralisation data, with a significant part having been gathered from a broad range of heritage sites. The methodology used to gather this acoustic data is discussed, together with the processes used in generating and calibrating a comparable computer model, and how the data generated might be analysed and presented. The creative use of this acoustic data is also considered, in the context of music production, mixed media artwork and audio for gaming. More specifically to digital heritage is how these data can be used to create new experiences of past environments, as information, interpretation, guide or artwork and ultimately help to articulate new research questions and explorations of our acoustic heritage.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCouncil for British Archaeologyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://intarch.ac.uk/journal/issue44/12/index.htmlen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Internet Archaeologyen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectacousticsen
dc.subjectheritageen
dc.subjectdigital creativityen
dc.subjectacoustic heritageen
dc.subjectauralisationen
dc.titleAcoustic Heritage and Audio Creativity: the Creative Application of Sound in the Representation, Understanding and Experience of Past Environmentsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalInternet Archaeologyen
dc.date.accepted2016-10-21-
rioxxterms.funderThis work and publication was supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences and Arts and Humanities Research Councils (EPSRC/AHRC) (AH/G015104/1, AH/H036938/1, AH/J013838/1, AH/N00356X/1)en
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUOW200917AFen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-09-20en
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