Chatting through pictures? A classification of images tweeted in one week in the UK and USA

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620661
Title:
Chatting through pictures? A classification of images tweeted in one week in the UK and USA
Authors:
Thelwall, Mike; Goriunova, Olga; Vis, Farida; Faulkner, Simon; Burns, Anne; Aulich, Jim; Mas-Bleda, Amalia; Stuart, Emma; D'Orazio, Francesco
Abstract:
Twitter is used by a substantial minority of the populations of many countries to share short messages, sometimes including images. Nevertheless, despite some research into specific images, such as selfies, and a few news stories about specific tweeted photographs, little is known about the types of images that are routinely shared. In response, this article reports a content analysis of random samples of 800 images tweeted from the UK or USA during a week at the end of 2014. Although most images were photographs, a substantial minority were hybrid or layered image forms: phone screenshots, collages, captioned pictures, and pictures of text messages. About half were primarily of one or more people, including 10% that were selfies, but a wide variety of other things were also pictured. Some of the images were for advertising or to share a joke but in most cases the purpose of the tweet seemed to be to share the minutiae of daily lives, performing the function of chat or gossip, sometimes in innovative ways.
Citation:
Chatting through pictures? A classification of images tweeted in one week in the UK and USA 2016, 67 (11):2575 Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology
Journal:
Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology
Issue Date:
Nov-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620661
DOI:
10.1002/asi.23620
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/asi.23620
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
23301635
Appears in Collections:
Media and PR

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThelwall, Mikeen
dc.contributor.authorGoriunova, Olgaen
dc.contributor.authorVis, Faridaen
dc.contributor.authorFaulkner, Simonen
dc.contributor.authorBurns, Anneen
dc.contributor.authorAulich, Jimen
dc.contributor.authorMas-Bleda, Amaliaen
dc.contributor.authorStuart, Emmaen
dc.contributor.authorD'Orazio, Francescoen
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-18T13:53:55Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-18T13:53:55Z-
dc.date.issued2016-11-
dc.identifier.citationChatting through pictures? A classification of images tweeted in one week in the UK and USA 2016, 67 (11):2575 Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technologyen
dc.identifier.issn23301635-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/asi.23620-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620661-
dc.description.abstractTwitter is used by a substantial minority of the populations of many countries to share short messages, sometimes including images. Nevertheless, despite some research into specific images, such as selfies, and a few news stories about specific tweeted photographs, little is known about the types of images that are routinely shared. In response, this article reports a content analysis of random samples of 800 images tweeted from the UK or USA during a week at the end of 2014. Although most images were photographs, a substantial minority were hybrid or layered image forms: phone screenshots, collages, captioned pictures, and pictures of text messages. About half were primarily of one or more people, including 10% that were selfies, but a wide variety of other things were also pictured. Some of the images were for advertising or to share a joke but in most cases the purpose of the tweet seemed to be to share the minutiae of daily lives, performing the function of chat or gossip, sometimes in innovative ways.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/asi.23620en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technologyen
dc.titleChatting through pictures? A classification of images tweeted in one week in the UK and USAen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the Association for Information Science and Technologyen
dc.contributor.institutionStatistical Cybermetrics Research Group; School of Mathematics and Computer Science; University of Wolverhampton; Wulfruna Street Wolverhampton WV1 1LY UK-
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Interdisciplinary Methodologies; University of Warwick; Gibbet Hill Road Coventry CV4 7AL UK-
dc.contributor.institutionInformation School; University of Sheffield; Regent Court, 211 Portobello Sheffield S1 4DP UK-
dc.contributor.institutionManchester School of Art; Manchester Metropolitan University; Cavendish Street Manchester M15 6BR UK-
dc.contributor.institutionInformation School; University of Sheffield; Regent Court, 211 Portobello Sheffield S1 4DP UK-
dc.contributor.institutionManchester School of Art; Manchester Metropolitan University; Cavendish Street Manchester M15 6BR UK-
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute of Public Goods and Policies; Spanish National Research Council (CSIC); C/Albasanz 26-28 28037 Madrid Spain-
dc.contributor.institutionStatistical Cybermetrics Research Group; School of Mathematics and Computer Science; University of Wolverhampton; Wulfruna Street Wolverhampton WV1 1LY UK-
dc.contributor.institutionPulsar; 7 Midford Place London W1T 5BG UK-
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