National Scientific Performance Evolution Patterns: Retrenchment, Successful Expansion, or Overextension

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620656
Title:
National Scientific Performance Evolution Patterns: Retrenchment, Successful Expansion, or Overextension
Authors:
Thelwall, Mike ( 0000-0001-6065-205X ) ; Levitt, Jonathan M.
Abstract:
National governments would like to preside over an expanding and increasingly high impact science system but are these two goals largely independent or closely linked? This article investigates the relationship between changes in the share of the world’s scientific output and changes in relative citation impact for 2.6 million articles from 26 fields in the 25 countries with the most Scopus-indexed journal articles from 1996 to 2015. There is a negative correlation between expansion and relative citation impact but their relationship varies. China, Spain, Australia, and Poland were successful overall across the 26 fields, expanding both their share of the world’s output and its relative citation impact, whereas Japan, France, Sweden and Israel had decreased shares and relative citation impact. In contrast, the USA, UK, Germany, Italy, Russia, Netherlands, Switzerland, Finland, and Denmark all enjoyed increased relative citation impact despite a declining share of publications. Finally, India, South Korea, Brazil, Taiwan, and Turkey all experienced sustained expansion but a recent fall in relative citation impact. These results may partly reflect changes in the coverage of Scopus and the selection of fields.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Journal:
Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology
Issue Date:
Nov-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620656
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)2330-1643/issues?year=2017
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2330-1643
Appears in Collections:
Statistical Cybermetrics Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThelwall, Mikeen
dc.contributor.authorLevitt, Jonathan M.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-08T10:41:33Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-08T10:41:33Z-
dc.date.issued2017-11-
dc.identifier.issn2330-1643en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620656-
dc.description.abstractNational governments would like to preside over an expanding and increasingly high impact science system but are these two goals largely independent or closely linked? This article investigates the relationship between changes in the share of the world’s scientific output and changes in relative citation impact for 2.6 million articles from 26 fields in the 25 countries with the most Scopus-indexed journal articles from 1996 to 2015. There is a negative correlation between expansion and relative citation impact but their relationship varies. China, Spain, Australia, and Poland were successful overall across the 26 fields, expanding both their share of the world’s output and its relative citation impact, whereas Japan, France, Sweden and Israel had decreased shares and relative citation impact. In contrast, the USA, UK, Germany, Italy, Russia, Netherlands, Switzerland, Finland, and Denmark all enjoyed increased relative citation impact despite a declining share of publications. Finally, India, South Korea, Brazil, Taiwan, and Turkey all experienced sustained expansion but a recent fall in relative citation impact. These results may partly reflect changes in the coverage of Scopus and the selection of fields.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)2330-1643/issues?year=2017en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectResearch evaluationen
dc.subjectScientometricsen
dc.titleNational Scientific Performance Evolution Patterns: Retrenchment, Successful Expansion, or Overextensionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the Association for Information Science and Technologyen
dc.date.accepted2017-09-
rioxxterms.funderInternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW08/0917MTen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-12-01en
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