Institutional pressures and sustainability assessment in supply chains

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620643
Title:
Institutional pressures and sustainability assessment in supply chains
Authors:
Kauppi, Katri; Hannibal, Claire ( 0000-0001-6840-9097 )
Abstract:
Purpose: Firms are increasingly held accountable for the welfare of workers across entire supply chains and so it is surprising that standard forms of governance for socially sustainable supply chain management have not yet emerged. Assessment initiatives have begun to develop as a proxy measure of social sustainable supply chain management. This research examines how social sustainability assessment initiatives instigate and use institutional pressures to drive third party accreditation as the legitimate means of demonstrating social sustainability in a global supply chain. Design/methodology/approach: Ten assessment initiatives focused on assuring social sustainability across supply chains are examined. Data is collected through interviews with senior managers and publicly available secondary material. Findings: The findings show how the social sustainability assessment initiatives act by instigating institutional pressures indirectly rather than directly. Coercive pressures are the most prevalent and are exerted through consumers and compliance requirements. The notion of pressures operating as a chain is proposed, and the recognition that actors within and outside of a supply chain are crucial to the institutionalization of social sustainability is discussed. Originality/value: Studies on sustainable supply chain management often focus on how companies sense and act upon institutional pressures. To add to the extant body of knowledge this study focuses on the sources of the pressures and demonstrates how assessment initiatives use coercive, normative and mimetic pressures to drive the adoption of social sustainability assessment in supply chains.
Publisher:
Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Journal:
Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
Issue Date:
Nov-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620643
Additional Links:
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journal/scm
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1359-8546
Appears in Collections:
FOSS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKauppi, Katrien
dc.contributor.authorHannibal, Claireen
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-31T14:28:57Z-
dc.date.available2017-08-31T14:28:57Z-
dc.date.issued2017-11-
dc.identifier.issn1359-8546en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620643-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Firms are increasingly held accountable for the welfare of workers across entire supply chains and so it is surprising that standard forms of governance for socially sustainable supply chain management have not yet emerged. Assessment initiatives have begun to develop as a proxy measure of social sustainable supply chain management. This research examines how social sustainability assessment initiatives instigate and use institutional pressures to drive third party accreditation as the legitimate means of demonstrating social sustainability in a global supply chain. Design/methodology/approach: Ten assessment initiatives focused on assuring social sustainability across supply chains are examined. Data is collected through interviews with senior managers and publicly available secondary material. Findings: The findings show how the social sustainability assessment initiatives act by instigating institutional pressures indirectly rather than directly. Coercive pressures are the most prevalent and are exerted through consumers and compliance requirements. The notion of pressures operating as a chain is proposed, and the recognition that actors within and outside of a supply chain are crucial to the institutionalization of social sustainability is discussed. Originality/value: Studies on sustainable supply chain management often focus on how companies sense and act upon institutional pressures. To add to the extant body of knowledge this study focuses on the sources of the pressures and demonstrates how assessment initiatives use coercive, normative and mimetic pressures to drive the adoption of social sustainability assessment in supply chains.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Limiteden
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.emeraldinsight.com/journal/scmen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectsupply chainen
dc.subjectfair tradeen
dc.subjectsocial sustainabilityen
dc.titleInstitutional pressures and sustainability assessment in supply chainsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalSupply Chain Management: An International Journalen
dc.date.accepted2017-08-
rioxxterms.funderInternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW310817CHen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-11-01en
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