Stray current induced corrosion of steel fibre reinforced concrete

5.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620626
Title:
Stray current induced corrosion of steel fibre reinforced concrete
Authors:
Tang, Kangkang ( 0000-0002-9289-937X )
Abstract:
Stray current induced corrosion is a major technical challenge for modern electric railway systems. The leakage of stray current to surrounding reinforced concrete structures can lead to steel reinforcement corrosion and the subsequent disintegration of concrete. Steel fibre reinforced concrete has been increasingly used as the railway tunnel lining material but it is not clear if discrete steel fibres can still pick up and transfer stray current in the same way as conventional steel reinforcement and lead to similar corrosion reactions. The corrosion behaviour of steel fibres was investigated through voltammetry tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The presence of high concentration chloride ions was found to increase the pitting corrosion tendency of steel fibres in simulated concrete pore solutions and mortar specimens. The chloride threshold level for corrosion of steel fibres in concrete is approximately 4% NaCl (by mass of cement) which is significantly higher than that of conventional steel reinforcement.
Citation:
Stray current induced corrosion of steel fibre reinforced concrete 2017, 100:445 Cement and Concrete Research
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Cement and Concrete Research
Issue Date:
Oct-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620626
DOI:
10.1016/j.cemconres.2017.08.004
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0008884617303009
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0008-8846
Appears in Collections:
FSE

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTang, Kangkangen
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-30T08:53:15Z-
dc.date.available2017-08-30T08:53:15Z-
dc.date.issued2017-10-
dc.identifier.citationStray current induced corrosion of steel fibre reinforced concrete 2017, 100:445 Cement and Concrete Researchen
dc.identifier.issn0008-8846en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cemconres.2017.08.004-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620626-
dc.description.abstractStray current induced corrosion is a major technical challenge for modern electric railway systems. The leakage of stray current to surrounding reinforced concrete structures can lead to steel reinforcement corrosion and the subsequent disintegration of concrete. Steel fibre reinforced concrete has been increasingly used as the railway tunnel lining material but it is not clear if discrete steel fibres can still pick up and transfer stray current in the same way as conventional steel reinforcement and lead to similar corrosion reactions. The corrosion behaviour of steel fibres was investigated through voltammetry tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The presence of high concentration chloride ions was found to increase the pitting corrosion tendency of steel fibres in simulated concrete pore solutions and mortar specimens. The chloride threshold level for corrosion of steel fibres in concrete is approximately 4% NaCl (by mass of cement) which is significantly higher than that of conventional steel reinforcement.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0008884617303009en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Cement and Concrete Researchen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectSteel fibre reinforced concreteen
dc.subjectEISen
dc.subjectCyclic voltammetryen
dc.subjectPotentiostaticen
dc.subjectPassivityen
dc.subjectPitting corrosionen
dc.titleStray current induced corrosion of steel fibre reinforced concreteen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalCement and Concrete Researchen
dc.date.accepted2017-08-
rioxxterms.funderInternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW300817KTen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-10-01en
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