Personal sacrifice and corporate cultures: career progression for disabled staff in higher education

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620572
Title:
Personal sacrifice and corporate cultures: career progression for disabled staff in higher education
Authors:
Brewster, Stephanie ( 0000-0001-6853-1551 ) ; Duncan, Neil; Emira, Mahmoud; Clifford, Angela
Abstract:
Disabled people are under-represented in higher education (HE), especially in senior posts. This article reports research on the perspectives of career progression into leadership held by disabled staff in one post-1992 university. Findings indicated that some participants were already engaged in leadership or aspired to such roles, and reported positive experiences. However, participants also experienced barriers to progression, including a lack of awareness of equality and diversity among managers and colleagues, inadequate professional development opportunities and the competitive organisational culture of management that could impact on their health and work–life balance. We conclude that disabled staff in HE do not yet have equal opportunities for progression into leadership roles compared with their non-disabled peers. There is a need for realignment of the culture of leadership and management to make it more compatible with the full inclusion of disabled staff in HE such that their unique contributions are valued.
Citation:
Personal sacrifice and corporate cultures: career progression for disabled staff in higher education 2017, 32 (7):1027 Disability & Society
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Journal:
Disability & Society, 32(7)
Issue Date:
12-Jun-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620572
DOI:
10.1080/09687599.2017.1331837
Additional Links:
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09687599.2017.1331837
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0968-7599
Appears in Collections:
FEHW

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBrewster, Stephanieen
dc.contributor.authorDuncan, Neilen
dc.contributor.authorEmira, Mahmouden
dc.contributor.authorClifford, Angelaen
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-08T14:55:41Z-
dc.date.available2017-08-08T14:55:41Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-12-
dc.identifier.citationPersonal sacrifice and corporate cultures: career progression for disabled staff in higher education 2017, 32 (7):1027 Disability & Societyen
dc.identifier.issn0968-7599en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09687599.2017.1331837-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620572-
dc.description.abstractDisabled people are under-represented in higher education (HE), especially in senior posts. This article reports research on the perspectives of career progression into leadership held by disabled staff in one post-1992 university. Findings indicated that some participants were already engaged in leadership or aspired to such roles, and reported positive experiences. However, participants also experienced barriers to progression, including a lack of awareness of equality and diversity among managers and colleagues, inadequate professional development opportunities and the competitive organisational culture of management that could impact on their health and work–life balance. We conclude that disabled staff in HE do not yet have equal opportunities for progression into leadership roles compared with their non-disabled peers. There is a need for realignment of the culture of leadership and management to make it more compatible with the full inclusion of disabled staff in HE such that their unique contributions are valued.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09687599.2017.1331837en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Disability & Societyen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectLeadershipen
dc.subjectdisabilityen
dc.subjecthigher educationen
dc.subjectcareer progressionen
dc.subjectdisabled staffen
dc.titlePersonal sacrifice and corporate cultures: career progression for disabled staff in higher educationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalDisability & Society, 32(7)en
dc.contributor.institutionFaculty of Education, Health and Well-Being, University of Wolverhampton, Walsall, UK-
dc.contributor.institutionFaculty of Education, Health and Well-Being, University of Wolverhampton, Walsall, UK-
dc.contributor.institutionResearch & Analytics, City and Guilds of London Institute, London, UK-
dc.contributor.institutionFaculty of Education, Health and Well-Being, University of Wolverhampton, Walsall, UK-
dc.date.accepted2017-05-
rioxxterms.funderLeadership Foundation for Higher Educationen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW080817SBen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-12-01en
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