Up-Dating: Ratings of Perceived Dating Success Are Better Online than Offline

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620568
Title:
Up-Dating: Ratings of Perceived Dating Success Are Better Online than Offline
Authors:
Fullwood, Chris; Attrill-Smith, Alison
Abstract:
The primary aims of this study were to test whether perceived dating success would differ between offline and online zero-acquaintance dating contexts, and to investigate the role that self-esteem might play in these evaluations. Participants were presented with the same photos of targets in either an offline or online dating scenario and rated their chances of dating success along with their perceptions of how attractive they thought the target would consider them. Higher self-esteem individuals believed they would be rated as more attractive. There was an overall perception that, irrespective of self-esteem level, meeting online would lead to better chances of dating success. These findings are considered in relation to an increased ability to more precisely manage impressions and develop an image of the self which would be evaluated more positively online.
Citation:
Up-Dating: Ratings of Perceived Dating Success Are Better Online than Offline 2017 Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking
Publisher:
Mary Ann Liebert
Journal:
Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking
Issue Date:
28-Jun-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620568
DOI:
10.1089/cyber.2016.0631
Additional Links:
http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/cyber.2016.0631
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2152-2715
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFullwood, Chrisen
dc.contributor.authorAttrill-Smith, Alisonen
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-31T14:38:05Z-
dc.date.available2017-07-31T14:38:05Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-28-
dc.identifier.citationUp-Dating: Ratings of Perceived Dating Success Are Better Online than Offline 2017 Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networkingen
dc.identifier.issn2152-2715en
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/cyber.2016.0631-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620568-
dc.description.abstractThe primary aims of this study were to test whether perceived dating success would differ between offline and online zero-acquaintance dating contexts, and to investigate the role that self-esteem might play in these evaluations. Participants were presented with the same photos of targets in either an offline or online dating scenario and rated their chances of dating success along with their perceptions of how attractive they thought the target would consider them. Higher self-esteem individuals believed they would be rated as more attractive. There was an overall perception that, irrespective of self-esteem level, meeting online would lead to better chances of dating success. These findings are considered in relation to an increased ability to more precisely manage impressions and develop an image of the self which would be evaluated more positively online.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMary Ann Lieberten
dc.relation.urlhttp://online.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/cyber.2016.0631en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networkingen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectOnline datingen
dc.subjectself-esteemen
dc.subjectself-presentationen
dc.titleUp-Dating: Ratings of Perceived Dating Success Are Better Online than Offlineen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalCyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networkingen
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute of Psychology, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, United Kingdom.-
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute of Psychology, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, United Kingdom.-
dc.date.accepted2017-06-
rioxxterms.funderInternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW310717CFen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-06-29en
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in WIRE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.