What will survive us? Sigurd Leeder and his Legacy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620563
Title:
What will survive us? Sigurd Leeder and his Legacy
Authors:
Lidbury, Clare
Abstract:
What was it about a single gesture by Peter Wright that made me exclaim “He must have studied with Leeder” (BBC TV 1988). What I had seen was a ‘central movement’ of the arm which Wright was using to demonstrate a possible intention for a reaching gesture. ‘Central movement’ is very distinctive and rarely performed, in my experience, by those who have not had some contact with the Jooss-Leeder training. In fact Wright had worked with Sigurd Leeder from 1944-47 receiving his first dance training and performing experience as an apprentice travelling with the Ballets Jooss on tour in the UK (Wright, 1993). Subsequently Wright studied and worked with many other teachers, mostly in classical ballet, and went on to play a significant part in the development of British Ballet in the second half of the twentieth century. Some 40 years on, having experienced and embraced it, that work with Leeder was still clearly imprinted in Wright’s body.
Publisher:
Society of Dance History Scholars
Journal:
Conversations across the Field of Dance Studies
Issue Date:
Apr-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620563
Additional Links:
https://sdhs.org/publications/conversations
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
FOA

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLidbury, Clareen
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-28T08:46:28Z-
dc.date.available2017-07-28T08:46:28Z-
dc.date.issued2017-04-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620563-
dc.description.abstractWhat was it about a single gesture by Peter Wright that made me exclaim “He must have studied with Leeder” (BBC TV 1988). What I had seen was a ‘central movement’ of the arm which Wright was using to demonstrate a possible intention for a reaching gesture. ‘Central movement’ is very distinctive and rarely performed, in my experience, by those who have not had some contact with the Jooss-Leeder training. In fact Wright had worked with Sigurd Leeder from 1944-47 receiving his first dance training and performing experience as an apprentice travelling with the Ballets Jooss on tour in the UK (Wright, 1993). Subsequently Wright studied and worked with many other teachers, mostly in classical ballet, and went on to play a significant part in the development of British Ballet in the second half of the twentieth century. Some 40 years on, having experienced and embraced it, that work with Leeder was still clearly imprinted in Wright’s body.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSociety of Dance History Scholarsen
dc.relation.urlhttps://sdhs.org/publications/conversationsen
dc.subjectSigurd Leederen
dc.subjectKurt Joossen
dc.subjectAnn Hutchinson Guesten
dc.subjectJane Winearlsen
dc.titleWhat will survive us? Sigurd Leeder and his Legacyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalConversations across the Field of Dance Studiesen
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