Exploring therapists’ experiences of using therapeutic interventions from Muslim perspectives for Muslim clients: Usefulness, contribution and challenges in the UK.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620562
Title:
Exploring therapists’ experiences of using therapeutic interventions from Muslim perspectives for Muslim clients: Usefulness, contribution and challenges in the UK.
Authors:
Choudhry, Abida
Abstract:
Modern psychological approaches currently being used with Muslim clients in therapy have consistently been criticised for being decontextualised, Eurocentric, individualistic, reductionist and for not taking Muslim clients’ cultural and religious values into account (Amri, & Bemak, 2013; Carter & Rashidi, 2004). Hence a need for making use of models, techniques and therapeutic interventions based on Muslim perspectives for Muslim clients has repeatedly been expressed (Haque, 2004a; Helms, 2015; Inayat, 2007; Keshavarzi & Haque, 2013; Utz, 2012; Weatherhead & Daiches, 2010). Despite recommendations for using therapeutic interventions from Muslim perspectives with Muslim clients in therapy (Abu Raiya & Pargament, 2010; Haque & Kamil, 2012; Qasqas & Jerry, 2014), empirical research on these interventions has lagged behind (Abu-Raiya & Pargament, 2011). The aim of the current study is to provide more insight into how interventions from Muslim perspectives can be administered by Muslim therapists with their Muslim clients in therapy in United Kingdom. This study explored the experiences of six Muslim therapists who were all using interventions from Muslim perspectives with Muslim clients in their therapeutic practice. Semi-structured interviews were conducted, transcribed, and analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA), and from this three main themes emerged (i) Psychotherapeutic approaches, (ii) Journey of becoming a Muslim therapist (iii) Obstacles faced by Muslim clients and therapists. The implications for further research and therapeutic practice have also been considered.
Issue Date:
2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620562
Type:
Thesis
Language:
en
Description:
A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of The University of Wolverhampton for the award of Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology.
Appears in Collections:
E-Theses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorChoudhry, Abidaen
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-20T14:01:23Z-
dc.date.available2017-07-20T14:01:23Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620562-
dc.descriptionA thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of The University of Wolverhampton for the award of Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology.en
dc.description.abstractModern psychological approaches currently being used with Muslim clients in therapy have consistently been criticised for being decontextualised, Eurocentric, individualistic, reductionist and for not taking Muslim clients’ cultural and religious values into account (Amri, & Bemak, 2013; Carter & Rashidi, 2004). Hence a need for making use of models, techniques and therapeutic interventions based on Muslim perspectives for Muslim clients has repeatedly been expressed (Haque, 2004a; Helms, 2015; Inayat, 2007; Keshavarzi & Haque, 2013; Utz, 2012; Weatherhead & Daiches, 2010). Despite recommendations for using therapeutic interventions from Muslim perspectives with Muslim clients in therapy (Abu Raiya & Pargament, 2010; Haque & Kamil, 2012; Qasqas & Jerry, 2014), empirical research on these interventions has lagged behind (Abu-Raiya & Pargament, 2011). The aim of the current study is to provide more insight into how interventions from Muslim perspectives can be administered by Muslim therapists with their Muslim clients in therapy in United Kingdom. This study explored the experiences of six Muslim therapists who were all using interventions from Muslim perspectives with Muslim clients in their therapeutic practice. Semi-structured interviews were conducted, transcribed, and analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA), and from this three main themes emerged (i) Psychotherapeutic approaches, (ii) Journey of becoming a Muslim therapist (iii) Obstacles faced by Muslim clients and therapists. The implications for further research and therapeutic practice have also been considered.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCounselling Muslimsen
dc.subjectMuslim therapeutic interventionsen
dc.subjecttherapeutic interventions from Muslim perspectivesen
dc.subjectMuslim healing beliefs and practicesen
dc.subjectMuslim Psychologyen
dc.subjectIslamic counsellingen
dc.subjectMuslims’ psychological issues in the UKen
dc.subjectMuslim indigenous interventionsen
dc.subjectIslamic therapyen
dc.subjectTherapy with Muslim clientsen
dc.titleExploring therapists’ experiences of using therapeutic interventions from Muslim perspectives for Muslim clients: Usefulness, contribution and challenges in the UK.en
dc.typeThesisen
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