Developing a model of disability that focuses on the actions of disabled people

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620530
Title:
Developing a model of disability that focuses on the actions of disabled people
Authors:
Levitt, Jonathan M.
Abstract:
Disabled people, writers on disability and disability activists stress the importance of disabled people being included in all aspects of society. I argue that a major omission from this inclusiveness, is that no current model of disability focuses on the impact of the actions of disabled people on disability. Disabled people are not passive bystanders, powerless to reduce the restrictions of disability. On the contrary, we are central to actively limiting its constraints. I develop a model of disability, called ‘active’, which focuses on the effects on disability of the individual and collective actions of disabled people. I describe published findings which indicate that engaging in self-help, using support groups and deploying assistive technology can all reduce the limitations of disability. Recent increases in the number of disability support groups and developments in assistive technology have substantially augmented the potential for disabled people to combat the effects of disability.
Citation:
Developing a model of disability that focuses on the actions of disabled people 2017, 32 (5):735 Disability & Society
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Disability & Society
Issue Date:
25-May-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620530
DOI:
10.1080/09687599.2017.1324764
Additional Links:
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09687599.2017.1324764
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0968-7599
Appears in Collections:
FOSS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLevitt, Jonathan M.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-26T08:56:48Z-
dc.date.available2017-06-26T08:56:48Z-
dc.date.issued2017-05-25-
dc.identifier.citationDeveloping a model of disability that focuses on the actions of disabled people 2017, 32 (5):735 Disability & Societyen
dc.identifier.issn0968-7599en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09687599.2017.1324764-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620530-
dc.description.abstractDisabled people, writers on disability and disability activists stress the importance of disabled people being included in all aspects of society. I argue that a major omission from this inclusiveness, is that no current model of disability focuses on the impact of the actions of disabled people on disability. Disabled people are not passive bystanders, powerless to reduce the restrictions of disability. On the contrary, we are central to actively limiting its constraints. I develop a model of disability, called ‘active’, which focuses on the effects on disability of the individual and collective actions of disabled people. I describe published findings which indicate that engaging in self-help, using support groups and deploying assistive technology can all reduce the limitations of disability. Recent increases in the number of disability support groups and developments in assistive technology have substantially augmented the potential for disabled people to combat the effects of disability.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09687599.2017.1324764en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Disability & Societyen
dc.subjectself-helpen
dc.subjectsupport groupsen
dc.subjectassistive technologyen
dc.subjectinclusivenessen
dc.subjectactivismen
dc.subjectmodel of disabilityen
dc.titleDeveloping a model of disability that focuses on the actions of disabled peopleen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalDisability & Societyen
dc.contributor.institutionResearch Institute of Information and Language Processing, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK-
dc.date.accepted2017-04-
rioxxterms.funderInternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW260617JLen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-11-01en
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in WIRE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.