Cardiorespiratory fitness and activity explains the obesity-deprivation relationship in children.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620519
Title:
Cardiorespiratory fitness and activity explains the obesity-deprivation relationship in children.
Authors:
Nevill, Alan M.; Duncan, Michael J; Lahart, Ian M; Sandercock, Gavin
Abstract:
This study examined the association between obesity and deprivation in English children and whether cardiorespiratory fitness or physical activity (PA) can explain this association. Obesity was assessed using IOTF criteria in 8,398 10-16 year olds. Social deprivation was measured using the Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) (subdivided into 3 groups; high, mid and low deprivation). Obesity was analysed using binary logistic regression with stature, age and sex incorporated as confounding variables. Children's fitness levels were assessed using predicted VO2 max (20-metre shuttle run test) and PA was estimated using the PA Questionnaire for Adolescents or Children (PAQ). A strong association was found between obesity and deprivation. When fitness and PA were added to the logistic regression models, increasing levels in both were found to reduce the odds of obesity, although it was only by including fitness into the model that the association between obesity and deprivation disappeared. Including estimated PA into the model was found to be curvilinear. Initial increases in PA increase the odds of obesity. Only by increasing PA to exceed the 71(st) percentile (PAQ = 3.22) did the odds of being obese start to decline. In order to reduce deprivation inequalities in children's weight-status, health practitioners should focus on increasing cardiorespiratory fitness via physical activity levels in areas of greater deprivation.
Citation:
Cardiorespiratory fitness and activity explains the obesity-deprivation relationship in children. 2017 Health Promot Int
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Journal:
Health promotion international
Issue Date:
6-Jan-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620519
DOI:
10.1093/heapro/daw106
PubMed ID:
28062521
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0957-4824
Appears in Collections:
Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNevill, Alan M.en
dc.contributor.authorDuncan, Michael Jen
dc.contributor.authorLahart, Ian Men
dc.contributor.authorSandercock, Gavinen
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-21T14:27:20Z-
dc.date.available2017-06-21T14:27:20Z-
dc.date.issued2017-01-06-
dc.identifier.citationCardiorespiratory fitness and activity explains the obesity-deprivation relationship in children. 2017 Health Promot Inten
dc.identifier.issn0957-4824en
dc.identifier.pmid28062521-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/heapro/daw106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620519-
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the association between obesity and deprivation in English children and whether cardiorespiratory fitness or physical activity (PA) can explain this association. Obesity was assessed using IOTF criteria in 8,398 10-16 year olds. Social deprivation was measured using the Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) (subdivided into 3 groups; high, mid and low deprivation). Obesity was analysed using binary logistic regression with stature, age and sex incorporated as confounding variables. Children's fitness levels were assessed using predicted VO2 max (20-metre shuttle run test) and PA was estimated using the PA Questionnaire for Adolescents or Children (PAQ). A strong association was found between obesity and deprivation. When fitness and PA were added to the logistic regression models, increasing levels in both were found to reduce the odds of obesity, although it was only by including fitness into the model that the association between obesity and deprivation disappeared. Including estimated PA into the model was found to be curvilinear. Initial increases in PA increase the odds of obesity. Only by increasing PA to exceed the 71(st) percentile (PAQ = 3.22) did the odds of being obese start to decline. In order to reduce deprivation inequalities in children's weight-status, health practitioners should focus on increasing cardiorespiratory fitness via physical activity levels in areas of greater deprivation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Health promotion internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectbinary logistic regressionen
dc.subjectcardiorespiratory fitnessen
dc.subjectphysical activityen
dc.titleCardiorespiratory fitness and activity explains the obesity-deprivation relationship in children.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalHealth promotion internationalen
dc.date.accepted2016-06-27-
rioxxterms.funderinternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUOW210617ANen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-01-06en

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