Socioeconomic Status and the Quality of Acute Stroke Care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620515
Title:
Socioeconomic Status and the Quality of Acute Stroke Care
Authors:
Pan, Yuesong; Chen, Ruoling; Li, Zixiao; Li, Hao; Zhao, Xingquan; Liu, Liping; Wang, Chunxue; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun
Abstract:
Background and Purpose—The association of socioeconomic status (SES) with quality of stroke care is not well understood, and few studies have examined the association with different indicators of SES simultaneously. We assessed the impacts of low levels of education, occupation, and income on the quality of stroke care. Methods—We examined data from the China National Stroke Registry recording consecutive stroke patients between September 2007 and August 2008. Baseline low SES was measured using educational level <6 years, occupation as manual workers or no job, and average family income per capita at ≤¥1000 per month. Compliance with 11 performances was summarized in a composite score defined as the proportion of all needed care given. Poor quality of care was defined as having a composite score of 0.71 or less. Results—Among 12 270 patients with ischemic stroke, 38.6% had <6 educational years, 37.6% had manual workers/no job, and 34.7% had income ≤¥1000 per month. There was an increased chance of receiving poor quality of care in patients with low education (adjusted odds ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval 1.03–1.28), low occupation (adjusted odds ratio 1.16, 95% confidence interval 1.01–1.32), and low income (adjusted odds ratio 1.18, 95% confidence interval 1.06–1.30), respectively. People with low SES had poor performances on some aspects of care quality. Combined effects existed among these SES indicators; those with low SES from all 3 indicators had the poorest quality of care. Conclusions—There was a social gradient in the quality of stroke care. Continuous efforts of socioeconomic improvement will increase the quality of acute stroke care.
Citation:
Socioeconomic Status and the Quality of Acute Stroke Care 2016, 47 (11):2836 Stroke
Publisher:
American Stroke Association
Journal:
Stroke
Issue Date:
Nov-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620515
DOI:
10.1161/STROKEAHA.116.013292
Additional Links:
http://stroke.ahajournals.org/lookup/doi/10.1161/STROKEAHA.116.013292; http://stroke.ahajournals.org/content/47/11/2836
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0039-2499
Sponsors:
The Ministry of Science and Technology of the People’s Republic of China (2006BAI01A11, 2011BAI08B01, 2011BAI08B02, 2012ZX09303-005-001, and 2013BAI09B03), The Beijing Biobank of Cerebral Vascular Disease (D131100005313003), Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders (BIBD-PXM2013_014226_07_000084)
Appears in Collections:
FEHW

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPan, Yuesongen
dc.contributor.authorChen, Ruolingen
dc.contributor.authorLi, Zixiaoen
dc.contributor.authorLi, Haoen
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Xingquanen
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Lipingen
dc.contributor.authorWang, Chunxueen
dc.contributor.authorWang, Yilongen
dc.contributor.authorWang, Yongjunen
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-14T14:19:18Z-
dc.date.available2017-06-14T14:19:18Z-
dc.date.issued2016-11-
dc.identifier.citationSocioeconomic Status and the Quality of Acute Stroke Care 2016, 47 (11):2836 Strokeen
dc.identifier.issn0039-2499en
dc.identifier.doi10.1161/STROKEAHA.116.013292-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620515-
dc.description.abstractBackground and Purpose—The association of socioeconomic status (SES) with quality of stroke care is not well understood, and few studies have examined the association with different indicators of SES simultaneously. We assessed the impacts of low levels of education, occupation, and income on the quality of stroke care. Methods—We examined data from the China National Stroke Registry recording consecutive stroke patients between September 2007 and August 2008. Baseline low SES was measured using educational level <6 years, occupation as manual workers or no job, and average family income per capita at ≤¥1000 per month. Compliance with 11 performances was summarized in a composite score defined as the proportion of all needed care given. Poor quality of care was defined as having a composite score of 0.71 or less. Results—Among 12 270 patients with ischemic stroke, 38.6% had <6 educational years, 37.6% had manual workers/no job, and 34.7% had income ≤¥1000 per month. There was an increased chance of receiving poor quality of care in patients with low education (adjusted odds ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval 1.03–1.28), low occupation (adjusted odds ratio 1.16, 95% confidence interval 1.01–1.32), and low income (adjusted odds ratio 1.18, 95% confidence interval 1.06–1.30), respectively. People with low SES had poor performances on some aspects of care quality. Combined effects existed among these SES indicators; those with low SES from all 3 indicators had the poorest quality of care. Conclusions—There was a social gradient in the quality of stroke care. Continuous efforts of socioeconomic improvement will increase the quality of acute stroke care.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Ministry of Science and Technology of the People’s Republic of China (2006BAI01A11, 2011BAI08B01, 2011BAI08B02, 2012ZX09303-005-001, and 2013BAI09B03), The Beijing Biobank of Cerebral Vascular Disease (D131100005313003), Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders (BIBD-PXM2013_014226_07_000084)en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Stroke Associationen
dc.relation.urlhttp://stroke.ahajournals.org/lookup/doi/10.1161/STROKEAHA.116.013292en
dc.relation.urlhttp://stroke.ahajournals.org/content/47/11/2836en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Strokeen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectSocioeconomic statusen
dc.subjectStrokeen
dc.subjectQuality of Careen
dc.titleSocioeconomic Status and the Quality of Acute Stroke Careen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalStrokeen
dc.date.accepted2016-10-
rioxxterms.funderThe Ministry of Science and Technology of the People’s Republic of China (2006BAI01A11, 2011BAI08B01, 2011BAI08B02, 2012ZX09303-005-001, and 2013BAI09B03), The Beijing Biobank of Cerebral Vascular Disease (D131100005313003), Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders (BIBD-PXM2013_014226_07_000084)en
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW140617RCen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-04-01en
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