Construction of Suicidal Ideation in Medical Records

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620514
Title:
Construction of Suicidal Ideation in Medical Records
Authors:
Galasinski, Dariusz; Ziółkowska, Justyna
Abstract:
In this paper we are interested in exploring discursive transformation of patients’ stories
of suicidal ideation into medical discourses. In other words, we focus on how the narrated experience of suicidal thoughts made during the psychiatric assessment interview is recorded in the patients’ medical record. Our data come from recordings of psychiatric interviews, as well as the doctors’ notes in the medical records made after the interviews, collected in psychiatric hospitals in Poland. Assuming a constructionist view of discourse, we demonstrate that lived experience of suicide ideation resulting in stories of a complex and homogeneous group of “thoughts” is reduced to brief statements of fact of presence/existence. Exploration of the relationship between the interviews and the notes suggest a stark imposition of the medical gaze upon them. We end with arguments that discursive practices relegating lived experience from the focus of clinical practice deprives it of information which is meaningful and clinically significant.
Citation:
Construction of Suicidal Ideation in Medical Records 2017 Death Studies
Publisher:
Routledge (Taylor & Francis)
Journal:
Death Studies
Issue Date:
19-May-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620514
DOI:
10.1080/07481187.2017.1332910
Additional Links:
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07481187.2017.1332910
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0748-1187
Appears in Collections:
FOSS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGalasinski, Dariuszen
dc.contributor.authorZiółkowska, Justynaen
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-14T13:28:51Z-
dc.date.available2017-06-14T13:28:51Z-
dc.date.issued2017-05-19-
dc.identifier.citationConstruction of Suicidal Ideation in Medical Records 2017 Death Studiesen
dc.identifier.issn0748-1187en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/07481187.2017.1332910-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620514-
dc.description.abstractIn this paper we are interested in exploring discursive transformation of patients’ stories
of suicidal ideation into medical discourses. In other words, we focus on how the narrated experience of suicidal thoughts made during the psychiatric assessment interview is recorded in the patients’ medical record. Our data come from recordings of psychiatric interviews, as well as the doctors’ notes in the medical records made after the interviews, collected in psychiatric hospitals in Poland. Assuming a constructionist view of discourse, we demonstrate that lived experience of suicide ideation resulting in stories of a complex and homogeneous group of “thoughts” is reduced to brief statements of fact of presence/existence. Exploration of the relationship between the interviews and the notes suggest a stark imposition of the medical gaze upon them. We end with arguments that discursive practices relegating lived experience from the focus of clinical practice deprives it of information which is meaningful and clinically significant.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledge (Taylor & Francis)en
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07481187.2017.1332910en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Death Studiesen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectsuicidal ideationen
dc.subjectmedical recordsen
dc.subjectdiscourse analysisen
dc.subjectqualitative studyen
dc.titleConstruction of Suicidal Ideation in Medical Recordsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalDeath Studiesen
dc.date.accepted2017-03-
rioxxterms.funderNational Science Centre, Polanden
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW140617DGen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-06-01en
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