Sedentary behaviour in rheumatoid arthritis: definition, measurement and implications for health

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620480
Title:
Sedentary behaviour in rheumatoid arthritis: definition, measurement and implications for health
Authors:
Fenton, Sally A. M.; Veldhuijzen van Zanten, Jet J. C. S.; Duda, Joan L.; Metsios, George S.; Kitas, George D.
Abstract:
RA is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by high grade-inflammation, and associated with elevated cardiovascular risk, rheumatoid-cachexia and functional impairment. Sedentary behaviour (SB) is linked to heightened inflammation, and is highly pervasive in RA, likely as a result of compromised physical function and persistent fatigue. This high sedentarity may exacerbate the inflammatory process in RA, and hold relevance for disease-related outcomes. The aim of this narrative review is to provide an overview of the definition, measurement and health relevance of SB in the context of RA. Contradictions are highlighted with regard to the manner in which SB is operationalized, and the significance of SB for disease outcomes in RA is outlined. The advantages and disadvantages of SB measurement approaches are also discussed. Against this background, we summarize studies that have reported SB and its health correlates in RA, and propose directions for future research.
Citation:
Sedentary behaviour in rheumatoid arthritis: definition, measurement and implications for health 2017 Rheumatology
Publisher:
Oxford Academic
Journal:
Rheumatology
Issue Date:
7-Apr-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620480
DOI:
10.1093/rheumatology/kex053
Additional Links:
https://academic.oup.com/rheumatology/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/rheumatology/kex053
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1462-0324
Appears in Collections:
FEHW

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFenton, Sally A. M.en
dc.contributor.authorVeldhuijzen van Zanten, Jet J. C. S.en
dc.contributor.authorDuda, Joan L.en
dc.contributor.authorMetsios, George S.en
dc.contributor.authorKitas, George D.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-22T14:13:49Z-
dc.date.available2017-05-22T14:13:49Z-
dc.date.issued2017-04-07-
dc.identifier.citationSedentary behaviour in rheumatoid arthritis: definition, measurement and implications for health 2017 Rheumatologyen
dc.identifier.issn1462-0324en
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/rheumatology/kex053-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620480-
dc.description.abstractRA is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by high grade-inflammation, and associated with elevated cardiovascular risk, rheumatoid-cachexia and functional impairment. Sedentary behaviour (SB) is linked to heightened inflammation, and is highly pervasive in RA, likely as a result of compromised physical function and persistent fatigue. This high sedentarity may exacerbate the inflammatory process in RA, and hold relevance for disease-related outcomes. The aim of this narrative review is to provide an overview of the definition, measurement and health relevance of SB in the context of RA. Contradictions are highlighted with regard to the manner in which SB is operationalized, and the significance of SB for disease outcomes in RA is outlined. The advantages and disadvantages of SB measurement approaches are also discussed. Against this background, we summarize studies that have reported SB and its health correlates in RA, and propose directions for future research.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford Academicen
dc.relation.urlhttps://academic.oup.com/rheumatology/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/rheumatology/kex053en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Rheumatologyen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectaccelerometeren
dc.subjectcachexiaen
dc.subjectcardiovascular risken
dc.subjectfunctional disabilityen
dc.subjectinflammationen
dc.subjectmeasurement validityen
dc.subjectrheumatoid arthritien
dc.subjectsedentary behaviour;en
dc.subjectsittingen
dc.titleSedentary behaviour in rheumatoid arthritis: definition, measurement and implications for healthen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalRheumatologyen
dc.date.accepted2017-04-
rioxxterms.funderInternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW220517GMen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-05-07en
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in WIRE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.