Assessing Dispositions Towards Ridicule and Laughter in the Workplace: Adapting and Validating the PhoPhiKat-9 Questionnaire

5.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620452
Title:
Assessing Dispositions Towards Ridicule and Laughter in the Workplace: Adapting and Validating the PhoPhiKat-9 Questionnaire
Authors:
Hofmann, Jennifer; Ruch, Willibald; Proyer, Rene T; Platt, Tracey; Gander, Fabian
Abstract:
The current paper addresses the measurement of three dispositions towards ridicule and laughter; i.e., gelotophobia (the fear of being laughed at), gelotophilia (the joy of being laughed at), and katagelasticism (the joy of laughing at others). These traits explain inter-individual differences in responses to humor, laughter, and social situations related to humorous encounters. First, an ultra-short form of the PhoPhiKat-45 (Ruch & Proyer, 2009) was adapted in two independent samples (Construction Sample N = 157; Replication Sample N = 1774). Second, we tested the validity of the PhoPhiKat-9 in two further independent samples. Results showed that the psychometric properties of the ultra-short form were acceptable and the proposed factor structure could be replicated. In Validation Sample 1 (N = 246), we investigated the relation of the three traits to responses in a ridicule and teasing scenario questionnaire. The results replicated findings from earlier studies by showing that gelotophobes assigned the same emotions to friendly teasing and malicious ridicule (predominantly low joy, high fear, and shame). Gelotophilia was mainly predicted by relating joy to both, teasing and ridicule scenarios, while katagelasticism was predicted by assigning joy and contempt to ridicule scenarios. In Validation Sample 2 (N = 1248), we investigated whether the fear of being laughed at is a vulnerability at the workplace: If friendly teasing and laughter of co-workers, superiors or customers are misperceived as being malicious, individuals may feel less satisfied and more stressed. The results from a representative sample of Swiss employees showed that individuals with a fear of being laughed at are generally less satisfied with life and work and experience more work stress. Moreover, gelotophilia went along with positive evaluations of one’s life and work, while katagelasticism was negatively related to work satisfaction and positively related to work stress. In order to establish good work practices and build procedures against workplace bullying, one needs to consider that individual differences impact on a person’s perception of being bullied and assessing the three dispositions may give important insights into team processes.
Publisher:
Frontiers Media S.A
Journal:
Frontiers in Psychology
Issue Date:
Apr-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620452
Additional Links:
http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00714/abstract
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1664-1078
Sponsors:
This publication benefited from the support of the Swiss National Centre of Competence in Research LIVES – Overcoming vulnerability: Life course perspectives, which is financed by the Swiss National Science Foundation (grant number: 51NF40-160590). The authors are grateful to the Swiss National Science Foundation for its financial assistance
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHofmann, Jenniferen
dc.contributor.authorRuch, Willibalden
dc.contributor.authorProyer, Rene Ten
dc.contributor.authorPlatt, Traceyen
dc.contributor.authorGander, Fabianen
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T13:30:52Z-
dc.date.available2017-04-24T13:30:52Z-
dc.date.issued2017-04-
dc.identifier.issn1664-1078en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620452-
dc.description.abstractThe current paper addresses the measurement of three dispositions towards ridicule and laughter; i.e., gelotophobia (the fear of being laughed at), gelotophilia (the joy of being laughed at), and katagelasticism (the joy of laughing at others). These traits explain inter-individual differences in responses to humor, laughter, and social situations related to humorous encounters. First, an ultra-short form of the PhoPhiKat-45 (Ruch & Proyer, 2009) was adapted in two independent samples (Construction Sample N = 157; Replication Sample N = 1774). Second, we tested the validity of the PhoPhiKat-9 in two further independent samples. Results showed that the psychometric properties of the ultra-short form were acceptable and the proposed factor structure could be replicated. In Validation Sample 1 (N = 246), we investigated the relation of the three traits to responses in a ridicule and teasing scenario questionnaire. The results replicated findings from earlier studies by showing that gelotophobes assigned the same emotions to friendly teasing and malicious ridicule (predominantly low joy, high fear, and shame). Gelotophilia was mainly predicted by relating joy to both, teasing and ridicule scenarios, while katagelasticism was predicted by assigning joy and contempt to ridicule scenarios. In Validation Sample 2 (N = 1248), we investigated whether the fear of being laughed at is a vulnerability at the workplace: If friendly teasing and laughter of co-workers, superiors or customers are misperceived as being malicious, individuals may feel less satisfied and more stressed. The results from a representative sample of Swiss employees showed that individuals with a fear of being laughed at are generally less satisfied with life and work and experience more work stress. Moreover, gelotophilia went along with positive evaluations of one’s life and work, while katagelasticism was negatively related to work satisfaction and positively related to work stress. In order to establish good work practices and build procedures against workplace bullying, one needs to consider that individual differences impact on a person’s perception of being bullied and assessing the three dispositions may give important insights into team processes.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis publication benefited from the support of the Swiss National Centre of Competence in Research LIVES – Overcoming vulnerability: Life course perspectives, which is financed by the Swiss National Science Foundation (grant number: 51NF40-160590). The authors are grateful to the Swiss National Science Foundation for its financial assistanceen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherFrontiers Media S.Aen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00714/abstracten
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectBullyingen
dc.subjectgelotophobiaen
dc.subjectLaughteren
dc.subjectWork satisfactionen
dc.subjectWork placeen
dc.subjectValidationen
dc.subjectscale developmenten
dc.titleAssessing Dispositions Towards Ridicule and Laughter in the Workplace: Adapting and Validating the PhoPhiKat-9 Questionnaireen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalFrontiers in Psychologyen
dc.date.accepted2017-04-
rioxxterms.funderSupported by Swiss National Science Foundation (grant number: 51NF40-160590)en
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW240417TPen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-04-24en
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