The Treatment of Informal Care Related Risks as Social Risks: An Analysis of the English Care Policy System

2.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620442
Title:
The Treatment of Informal Care Related Risks as Social Risks: An Analysis of the English Care Policy System
Authors:
Morgan, Fiona ( 0000-0002-6648-4517 )
Abstract:
The social risk literature examines the extent to which states have provided social protection against the ‘old’ social risks of the post-war era and the ‘new’ social risks affecting post-industrial capitalist states. In this paper the contingency of the provision of informal care to people aged 65 and over is discussed. The paper deconstructs the concept of social risk to determine the characteristics and processes which contribute to states recognising specific contingencies as social risks which require social protection. This conceptualisation is applied to make the case that care related risks associated with the informal care of older people should be recognised and treated as social risks by states. Data from a qualitative study of the English care policy system provide empirical evidence that informal care related risks are recognised, but not treated, as social risks in England. The findings reveal informal carers and the older people they care for receive inadequate and inconsistent statutory protection against the poverty and welfare risks they face, furthermore the design and operationalisation of the English care policy system generates risks for care relationships.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Journal:
Journal of Social Policy
Issue Date:
Jul-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620442
Additional Links:
https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-social-policy/all-issues
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0047-2794
Appears in Collections:
FEHW

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Fionaen
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-05T14:55:28Z-
dc.date.available2017-04-05T14:55:28Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-
dc.identifier.issn0047-2794en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620442-
dc.description.abstractThe social risk literature examines the extent to which states have provided social protection against the ‘old’ social risks of the post-war era and the ‘new’ social risks affecting post-industrial capitalist states. In this paper the contingency of the provision of informal care to people aged 65 and over is discussed. The paper deconstructs the concept of social risk to determine the characteristics and processes which contribute to states recognising specific contingencies as social risks which require social protection. This conceptualisation is applied to make the case that care related risks associated with the informal care of older people should be recognised and treated as social risks by states. Data from a qualitative study of the English care policy system provide empirical evidence that informal care related risks are recognised, but not treated, as social risks in England. The findings reveal informal carers and the older people they care for receive inadequate and inconsistent statutory protection against the poverty and welfare risks they face, furthermore the design and operationalisation of the English care policy system generates risks for care relationships.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-social-policy/all-issuesen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectsocial risken
dc.subjectinformal careen
dc.subjectolder peopleen
dc.subjectcare policiesen
dc.subjectrisk-shiftingen
dc.subjectCare Act 2014en
dc.titleThe Treatment of Informal Care Related Risks as Social Risks: An Analysis of the English Care Policy Systemen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Social Policyen
dc.date.accepted2017-03-
rioxxterms.funderInternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW050417FMen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-07-01en
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