Sound Transmission Loss of Light-Weight Slotted Steel Studs in a Gypsum Plasterboard Partition Wall

5.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620441
Title:
Sound Transmission Loss of Light-Weight Slotted Steel Studs in a Gypsum Plasterboard Partition Wall
Authors:
Arjunan, Arun ( 0000-0001-5493-0957 )
Abstract:
Acoustic bridging through structural links is known to reduce the Sound Transmission Loss (STL) of gypsum plasterboard partition walls with steel studs. As multifamily housing become more popular, stud manufacturers are increasingly interested in improving the acoustic characteristics of steel studs to improve the sound insulation. This work is an initial attempt to understand the influence of slotted stud configurations on the sound transmission loss (STL) of partition walls. A case of partition wall commonly known as the double-leaf wall incorporating a slotted stud design is analysed experimentally and numerically based on the ISO10140 guidelines. The numerical model used for the analysis is validated using experimental test at one-third-octave bands for a frequency range of 100 to 3150 Hz. The slot configurations are designed keeping the slot to non-slot area constant to identify the effect of slot location on the acoustic and structural behaviour. The results of this study provide a better understanding of the acoustic performance of double-leaf walls that use slotted stud sections. It is considered that this can help in developing acoustically efficient stud based partition walls to reduce acoustic bridging.
Publisher:
German Acoustical Society (DEGA)
Journal:
INTER-NOISE 2016 (ISSN 0105-175x)
Issue Date:
Aug-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620441
Additional Links:
http://www.internoise2016.org/
Type:
Meetings and Proceedings
Language:
en
ISSN:
0105-175x
ISBN:
9783939296119
Appears in Collections:
Engineering and Technology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorArjunan, Arunen
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-05T14:26:38Z-
dc.date.available2017-04-05T14:26:38Z-
dc.date.issued2017-08-
dc.identifier.isbn9783939296119-
dc.identifier.issn0105-175xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620441-
dc.description.abstractAcoustic bridging through structural links is known to reduce the Sound Transmission Loss (STL) of gypsum plasterboard partition walls with steel studs. As multifamily housing become more popular, stud manufacturers are increasingly interested in improving the acoustic characteristics of steel studs to improve the sound insulation. This work is an initial attempt to understand the influence of slotted stud configurations on the sound transmission loss (STL) of partition walls. A case of partition wall commonly known as the double-leaf wall incorporating a slotted stud design is analysed experimentally and numerically based on the ISO10140 guidelines. The numerical model used for the analysis is validated using experimental test at one-third-octave bands for a frequency range of 100 to 3150 Hz. The slot configurations are designed keeping the slot to non-slot area constant to identify the effect of slot location on the acoustic and structural behaviour. The results of this study provide a better understanding of the acoustic performance of double-leaf walls that use slotted stud sections. It is considered that this can help in developing acoustically efficient stud based partition walls to reduce acoustic bridging.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherGerman Acoustical Society (DEGA)en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.internoise2016.org/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjecttransmission lossen
dc.subjectdouble-leaf wallen
dc.subjectISO10140en
dc.subjectone third octaveen
dc.subjectinsulationen
dc.subjectsounden
dc.titleSound Transmission Loss of Light-Weight Slotted Steel Studs in a Gypsum Plasterboard Partition Wallen
dc.typeMeetings and Proceedingsen
dc.identifier.journalINTER-NOISE 2016 (ISSN 0105-175x)en
dc.date.accepted2016-04-
rioxxterms.funderInternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW050417AAen
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-04-05en
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