‘Technologizing’ the postgraduate classroom

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620439
Title:
‘Technologizing’ the postgraduate classroom
Authors:
Smith, Sara; Khechara, Martin
Abstract:
The MSc Biomedical Science award like many other awards at Masters Level attracts students from a range of undergraduate studies as well as a large number of international students. Transition from undergraduate to postgraduate learner is challenging for most students. For those who have studied on generic UG courses or those with non-UK degrees, this transition is potentially more difficult, and students often struggle with the specialist context of this award. We describe an investigation which evaluated the use of two current technologies available to support learning and teaching to enhance the student experience and consequently engagement. Panopto software allows lectures to be captured by tutors and watched by students outside of taught sessions (flipped). This provides more time during class to focus upon application of knowledge, to address more complex topics, develop problem solving skills and for students to benefit from peer and tutor support during contact time. Socrative enables the use of instantaneous questioning and feedback of students’ responses using mobile devices. It provides the tutor with an insight into levels of understanding, as well as allowing students to evaluate their own progress. Evaluation and comparison of the non-traditional vs. traditional delivery was undertaken via questionnaires and focus group interviews with students. Analysis of the data illustrates that although the use of technology is identified as being a valuable addition to the learning environment, it is the relationships built in the safe space of group working tasks afforded by the technology that is most beneficial in aiding engagement. Indeed, many factors that influence student sense of belonging also in turn promote success; attainment and engagement and are identified as being enhanced by the approach used.
Citation:
Issues in Masters Level Courses, Edited by Pauline Kneale and Wendy Miller. PedRIO paper 10, pp 21-29
Publisher:
Pedagogic Research Institute and Observatory (PedRIO)
Issue Date:
2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620439
Additional Links:
https://www.plymouth.ac.uk/uploads/production/document/path/7/7921/PedRIO_Paper_10.pdf; https://www.plymouth.ac.uk/research/institutes/pedagogic/archived-events/masters-level-teaching-conference-2016
Type:
Meetings and Proceedings
Language:
en
ISSN:
2052-5818
Appears in Collections:
FSE

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Saraen
dc.contributor.authorKhechara, Martinen
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-05T11:11:39Z-
dc.date.available2017-04-05T11:11:39Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationIssues in Masters Level Courses, Edited by Pauline Kneale and Wendy Miller. PedRIO paper 10, pp 21-29en
dc.identifier.issn2052-5818-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620439-
dc.description.abstractThe MSc Biomedical Science award like many other awards at Masters Level attracts students from a range of undergraduate studies as well as a large number of international students. Transition from undergraduate to postgraduate learner is challenging for most students. For those who have studied on generic UG courses or those with non-UK degrees, this transition is potentially more difficult, and students often struggle with the specialist context of this award. We describe an investigation which evaluated the use of two current technologies available to support learning and teaching to enhance the student experience and consequently engagement. Panopto software allows lectures to be captured by tutors and watched by students outside of taught sessions (flipped). This provides more time during class to focus upon application of knowledge, to address more complex topics, develop problem solving skills and for students to benefit from peer and tutor support during contact time. Socrative enables the use of instantaneous questioning and feedback of students’ responses using mobile devices. It provides the tutor with an insight into levels of understanding, as well as allowing students to evaluate their own progress. Evaluation and comparison of the non-traditional vs. traditional delivery was undertaken via questionnaires and focus group interviews with students. Analysis of the data illustrates that although the use of technology is identified as being a valuable addition to the learning environment, it is the relationships built in the safe space of group working tasks afforded by the technology that is most beneficial in aiding engagement. Indeed, many factors that influence student sense of belonging also in turn promote success; attainment and engagement and are identified as being enhanced by the approach used.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPedagogic Research Institute and Observatory (PedRIO)en
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.plymouth.ac.uk/uploads/production/document/path/7/7921/PedRIO_Paper_10.pdfen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.plymouth.ac.uk/research/institutes/pedagogic/archived-events/masters-level-teaching-conference-2016en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectFlippeden
dc.subjectSocrativeen
dc.subjectPanoptoen
dc.subjectEngagementen
dc.subjectBelongingen
dc.title‘Technologizing’ the postgraduate classroomen
dc.typeMeetings and Proceedingsen
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in WIRE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.