2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620429
Title:
What do people really do at work? Job analysis and design
Authors:
Woods, Stephen A; Hinton, Danny ( 0000-0003-3964-7533 )
Abstract:
What do people really do at work? Or to phrase the question differently, what is the content and nature of different jobs in organizations? What should people do in their respective jobs in order to deliver organizational strategy? This chapter introduces the means by which these questions are answered: job analysis. In this chapter, job analysis is defined, and its place within a number of wider organisational systems is explored. Following this, the distinction is drawn between two broad types of analysis: work-oriented and worker-oriented analysis in terms of their focus and the end products that they are used to generate. A number of both work- and worker-oriented methods for the collection of job analysis data are described, after which are considered some specific organisational contexts in which job analysis data is used in the form of Training Needs Analysis and job design. Finally, two modern alternatives to the classical approach to job analysis are described: competency profiling and work analysis. These approaches are explored in terms of the benefits that they can provide to practitioners in overcoming some of the limitations of traditional approaches to job analysis in the modern working world.
Citation:
In: Nik Chmiel, Franco Fraccaroli, Magnus Sverke (Editors), An Introduction to Work and Organizational Psychology: An International Perspective, 3rd Edition, Ch 1
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Issue Date:
May-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620429
Additional Links:
http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1119168023.html
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
ISBN:
9781119168027
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWoods, Stephen Aen
dc.contributor.authorHinton, Dannyen
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-24T09:14:36Z-
dc.date.available2017-03-24T09:14:36Z-
dc.date.issued2017-05-
dc.identifier.citationIn: Nik Chmiel, Franco Fraccaroli, Magnus Sverke (Editors), An Introduction to Work and Organizational Psychology: An International Perspective, 3rd Edition, Ch 1en
dc.identifier.isbn9781119168027-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620429-
dc.description.abstractWhat do people really do at work? Or to phrase the question differently, what is the content and nature of different jobs in organizations? What should people do in their respective jobs in order to deliver organizational strategy? This chapter introduces the means by which these questions are answered: job analysis. In this chapter, job analysis is defined, and its place within a number of wider organisational systems is explored. Following this, the distinction is drawn between two broad types of analysis: work-oriented and worker-oriented analysis in terms of their focus and the end products that they are used to generate. A number of both work- and worker-oriented methods for the collection of job analysis data are described, after which are considered some specific organisational contexts in which job analysis data is used in the form of Training Needs Analysis and job design. Finally, two modern alternatives to the classical approach to job analysis are described: competency profiling and work analysis. These approaches are explored in terms of the benefits that they can provide to practitioners in overcoming some of the limitations of traditional approaches to job analysis in the modern working world.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.relation.urlhttp://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1119168023.htmlen
dc.subjectOccupational Psychologyen
dc.subjectWork Psychologyen
dc.subjectOrganizational Psychologyen
dc.subjectJob Analysisen
dc.subjectJob Designen
dc.titleWhat do people really do at work? Job analysis and designen
dc.typeBook chapteren
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