Assessment of bioavailability of some potential toxic metals in mining-affected soils using EDTA extraction and principle component analysis (PCA) approach, Derbyshire, UK

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620383
Title:
Assessment of bioavailability of some potential toxic metals in mining-affected soils using EDTA extraction and principle component analysis (PCA) approach, Derbyshire, UK
Authors:
Zahid, O, Alibrahim; Williams, Craig D.
Abstract:
The current study area has long mining history for copper, lead, and zinc. As a result, these metals may have elevated levels and pose a potential risk to the surrounding area. This area is currently being used for agriculture and sheep rearing, therefore, the bioavailable fraction of some selected heavy metals namely (Cu, Pb, Zn, Mn, Cr, Ni, and V) has been evaluated using 0.01 M EDTA procedure, as this would help for better understanding of the risk that these heavy metals can pose to living organisms. A total of 51 samples of topsoils, floodplain soils, and stream sediment soils were collected and analysed for their total concentrations using ICP (Inductively Coupled Plasma) optical emission spectroscopy. Results show that, depending on the bioavailable ratio, soil samples have the biggest EDTA extractable amount for all studied metals, except for Mn and Cr for which highest levels were found in the floodplain samples. However, based on national bioavailable mean amount in England and Wales, the amount of EDTA metal extractable for all selected metals from soil samples are exceeded the national average amounts of England and Wales, except for Mn and Ni, whereas in floodplain and stream sediment samples, all EDTA metals extractions are lower than the national mean levels, except Cu and Zn for flood plan samples. Principal component analysis (PCA) technique was performed to investigate how the bioavailable fractions of studied metals and factors namely (organic matter contents, soil pH, and different granulometric ranges) are correlated. Results show that both organic matter amounts and fine fractions (clay and silt) were the master factors controlling the bioavailable portion in all soil types.
Publisher:
Interdisciplinary Journal of Chemistry
Journal:
Interdisciplinary Journal of Chemistry, Volume 1(2): 1-8
Issue Date:
Dec-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620383
Additional Links:
https://oatext.com/Interdisciplinary-Journal-of-Chemistry-IJC.php
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2398-7537
Appears in Collections:
FSE

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorZahid, O, Alibrahimen
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Craig D.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-21T14:27:06Z-
dc.date.available2017-02-21T14:27:06Z-
dc.date.issued2016-12-
dc.identifier.issn2398-7537en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620383-
dc.description.abstractThe current study area has long mining history for copper, lead, and zinc. As a result, these metals may have elevated levels and pose a potential risk to the surrounding area. This area is currently being used for agriculture and sheep rearing, therefore, the bioavailable fraction of some selected heavy metals namely (Cu, Pb, Zn, Mn, Cr, Ni, and V) has been evaluated using 0.01 M EDTA procedure, as this would help for better understanding of the risk that these heavy metals can pose to living organisms. A total of 51 samples of topsoils, floodplain soils, and stream sediment soils were collected and analysed for their total concentrations using ICP (Inductively Coupled Plasma) optical emission spectroscopy. Results show that, depending on the bioavailable ratio, soil samples have the biggest EDTA extractable amount for all studied metals, except for Mn and Cr for which highest levels were found in the floodplain samples. However, based on national bioavailable mean amount in England and Wales, the amount of EDTA metal extractable for all selected metals from soil samples are exceeded the national average amounts of England and Wales, except for Mn and Ni, whereas in floodplain and stream sediment samples, all EDTA metals extractions are lower than the national mean levels, except Cu and Zn for flood plan samples. Principal component analysis (PCA) technique was performed to investigate how the bioavailable fractions of studied metals and factors namely (organic matter contents, soil pH, and different granulometric ranges) are correlated. Results show that both organic matter amounts and fine fractions (clay and silt) were the master factors controlling the bioavailable portion in all soil types.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInterdisciplinary Journal of Chemistryen
dc.relation.urlhttps://oatext.com/Interdisciplinary-Journal-of-Chemistry-IJC.phpen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectheavy metalsen
dc.subjectbioavailabilityen
dc.subjectPCAen
dc.subjectEDTAen
dc.subjectnational averageen
dc.subjecttopsoilsen
dc.titleAssessment of bioavailability of some potential toxic metals in mining-affected soils using EDTA extraction and principle component analysis (PCA) approach, Derbyshire, UKen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalInterdisciplinary Journal of Chemistry, Volume 1(2): 1-8en
dc.date.accepted2016-12-
rioxxterms.funderInternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW210217CWen
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-02-21en
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