Evaluation and assessment of the usefulness of a mail delivered personalised diabetes information booklet and the association of non-response with clinical risk: the WICKED Project

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620370
Title:
Evaluation and assessment of the usefulness of a mail delivered personalised diabetes information booklet and the association of non-response with clinical risk: the WICKED Project
Authors:
Gillani, Syed MR; Nevill, Alan M.; Singh, Baldev M
Abstract:
Introduction: Patient activation can promote partnership working between people with diabetes and their healthcare professionals. We sent to people with diabetes a personalised, structured information booklet containing the results of their latest nine key care processes in order to inform and activate them. We present the findings of a survey to assess the utility of this report, with an analysis of the association of non-response to the survey, a surrogate for poorer patient activation, with adverse diabetes and clinical outcomes. Methods: All 14,559 people with diabetes in the Wolverhampton health economy received a mailed report of the results of their latest nine diabetes care processes. Of these, 6,282 patients aged <75 years were mailed this report twice; 1000 of these 6,282 patients were selected randomly to receive a structured questionnaire to assess the report’s effectiveness. Results: Of 1,000 patients, 419 (42%) responded (mean age 62±10 years, 246 males, 249 Caucasians, 389 had type 2 diabetes). Patients found this report useful (89%), a source of knowledge (78%), a source of increased confidence (74%) and it helped them understand their diabetes (78%). Non-response was associated with significantly higher surrogate markers of micro- and macrovascular risk. Conclusion: A structured and personalised diabetes report, without direct professional or health service intervention, may improve the understanding and confidence of people with diabetes in their self-care and it may help to activate them to take a stronger partnership role in their health care. Non-response as a marker of patient activation is associated with increased clinical risk.
Citation:
Evaluation and assessment of the usefulness of a mail delivered personalised diabetes information booklet and the association of non-response with clinical risk: the WICKED Project 2016, 16 (4):179 British Journal of Diabetes
Publisher:
Association of British Clinical Diabetologists
Journal:
British Journal of Diabetes
Issue Date:
27-Sep-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620370
DOI:
10.15277/bjd.2016.099
Additional Links:
http://www.bjd-abcd.com/index.php/bjd/article/view/181
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2397-6241; 2397-6233
Appears in Collections:
Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGillani, Syed MRen
dc.contributor.authorNevill, Alan M.en
dc.contributor.authorSingh, Baldev Men
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-06T15:02:54Z-
dc.date.available2017-02-06T15:02:54Z-
dc.date.issued2016-09-27-
dc.identifier.citationEvaluation and assessment of the usefulness of a mail delivered personalised diabetes information booklet and the association of non-response with clinical risk: the WICKED Project 2016, 16 (4):179 British Journal of Diabetesen
dc.identifier.issn2397-6241-
dc.identifier.issn2397-6233-
dc.identifier.doi10.15277/bjd.2016.099-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620370-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Patient activation can promote partnership working between people with diabetes and their healthcare professionals. We sent to people with diabetes a personalised, structured information booklet containing the results of their latest nine key care processes in order to inform and activate them. We present the findings of a survey to assess the utility of this report, with an analysis of the association of non-response to the survey, a surrogate for poorer patient activation, with adverse diabetes and clinical outcomes. Methods: All 14,559 people with diabetes in the Wolverhampton health economy received a mailed report of the results of their latest nine diabetes care processes. Of these, 6,282 patients aged <75 years were mailed this report twice; 1000 of these 6,282 patients were selected randomly to receive a structured questionnaire to assess the report’s effectiveness. Results: Of 1,000 patients, 419 (42%) responded (mean age 62±10 years, 246 males, 249 Caucasians, 389 had type 2 diabetes). Patients found this report useful (89%), a source of knowledge (78%), a source of increased confidence (74%) and it helped them understand their diabetes (78%). Non-response was associated with significantly higher surrogate markers of micro- and macrovascular risk. Conclusion: A structured and personalised diabetes report, without direct professional or health service intervention, may improve the understanding and confidence of people with diabetes in their self-care and it may help to activate them to take a stronger partnership role in their health care. Non-response as a marker of patient activation is associated with increased clinical risk.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAssociation of British Clinical Diabetologistsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.bjd-abcd.com/index.php/bjd/article/view/181en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to British Journal of Diabetesen
dc.subjectcare deliveryen
dc.subjectpatient activationen
dc.subjectpatient engagementen
dc.subjectinformation provisionen
dc.subjectdiabetesen
dc.titleEvaluation and assessment of the usefulness of a mail delivered personalised diabetes information booklet and the association of non-response with clinical risk: the WICKED Projecten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Diabetesen
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