From Outsider to Established – Explaining the Current Popularity and Acceptability of Tattooing

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620369
Title:
From Outsider to Established – Explaining the Current Popularity and Acceptability of Tattooing
Authors:
Rees, Michael
Abstract:
Tattooing is a practice long associated with social outsiders – sailors, criminals, bikers and women of disrepute. In recent years, however, the practice has become increasingly popular, and acceptable, in mainstream culture as these marks of distinction appear on an ever greater number of bodies. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork, academic literature, and content analysis of popular media, I propose that four inter-related developments have contributed to the redefinition of tattooing: the increasing importance of the body as a site for constructing identity; processes of cultural diversity and globalization; the increased visibility of the practice in popular culture; and attempts to legitimise the practice as an acceptable art form both within academia and popular culture. By drawing together these inter-related developments this paper demonstrates how Elias’ theories of establishedoutsider relations provides an understanding of the processes that lead to changing statuses for certain cultural practices.
Citation:
Rees, Michael. “From Outsider to Established - Explaining the Current Popularity and Acceptability of Tattooing.” Historical Social Research / Historische Sozialforschung, vol. 41, no. 3 (157), 2016, pp. 157–174. www.jstor.org/stable/43997044
Publisher:
GESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences
Journal:
Historical Social Research 41 (2016) 3, 157-174 │© GESIS DOI: 10.12759/hsr.41.2016.3.157-174
Issue Date:
Oct-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620369
Additional Links:
http://www.jstor.org/stable/43997044
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0172-6404
Appears in Collections:
FOSS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRees, Michaelen
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-06T14:52:49Z-
dc.date.available2017-02-06T14:52:49Z-
dc.date.issued2016-10-
dc.identifier.citationRees, Michael. “From Outsider to Established - Explaining the Current Popularity and Acceptability of Tattooing.” Historical Social Research / Historische Sozialforschung, vol. 41, no. 3 (157), 2016, pp. 157–174. www.jstor.org/stable/43997044en
dc.identifier.issn0172-6404en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620369-
dc.description.abstractTattooing is a practice long associated with social outsiders – sailors, criminals, bikers and women of disrepute. In recent years, however, the practice has become increasingly popular, and acceptable, in mainstream culture as these marks of distinction appear on an ever greater number of bodies. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork, academic literature, and content analysis of popular media, I propose that four inter-related developments have contributed to the redefinition of tattooing: the increasing importance of the body as a site for constructing identity; processes of cultural diversity and globalization; the increased visibility of the practice in popular culture; and attempts to legitimise the practice as an acceptable art form both within academia and popular culture. By drawing together these inter-related developments this paper demonstrates how Elias’ theories of establishedoutsider relations provides an understanding of the processes that lead to changing statuses for certain cultural practices.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherGESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciencesen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.jstor.org/stable/43997044en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectNorbert Eliasen
dc.subjectFigurational Sociologyen
dc.subjectProcess Sociologyen
dc.subjectTattooingen
dc.subjectSociology of the Bodyen
dc.subjectIdentityen
dc.titleFrom Outsider to Established – Explaining the Current Popularity and Acceptability of Tattooingen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalHistorical Social Research 41 (2016) 3, 157-174 │© GESIS DOI: 10.12759/hsr.41.2016.3.157-174en
dc.date.accepted2016-09-
rioxxterms.funderInternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW06/02/17MRen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-10-01en
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