The rise and fall of life-wide learning for adults in England

3.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620359
Title:
The rise and fall of life-wide learning for adults in England
Authors:
Tuckett, Alan
Abstract:
This article analyses policy and practice in social and cultural education for adults in England in the post Second World War era, beginning with the flowering of municipal adult education and the expansion of university extra-mural provision. It tracks the emerging policy focus on extending participation to under-represented groups, and on securing a rich breadth of curriculum (life-wide learning), which flowered in the 1990s. It maps, and deprecates the subsequent narrowing of public investment to an increasingly utilitarian focus on qualifications for labour market participation with the rise of Treasury (finance ministry) influence on adult learning policy from 2003. Evidence of the wider benefits that derive from participation in learning is used to re-assert the case for publicly accessible lifelong, life-wide education for adults.
Citation:
The rise and fall of life-wide learning for adults in England 2017:1 International Journal of Lifelong Education
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
International Journal of Lifelong Education
Issue Date:
10-Jan-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620359
DOI:
10.1080/02601370.2017.1274546
Additional Links:
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02601370.2017.1274546
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0260-1370
Appears in Collections:
FEHW

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTuckett, Alanen
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-01T15:00:25Z-
dc.date.available2017-02-01T15:00:25Z-
dc.date.issued2017-01-10-
dc.identifier.citationThe rise and fall of life-wide learning for adults in England 2017:1 International Journal of Lifelong Educationen
dc.identifier.issn0260-1370en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02601370.2017.1274546-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620359-
dc.description.abstractThis article analyses policy and practice in social and cultural education for adults in England in the post Second World War era, beginning with the flowering of municipal adult education and the expansion of university extra-mural provision. It tracks the emerging policy focus on extending participation to under-represented groups, and on securing a rich breadth of curriculum (life-wide learning), which flowered in the 1990s. It maps, and deprecates the subsequent narrowing of public investment to an increasingly utilitarian focus on qualifications for labour market participation with the rise of Treasury (finance ministry) influence on adult learning policy from 2003. Evidence of the wider benefits that derive from participation in learning is used to re-assert the case for publicly accessible lifelong, life-wide education for adults.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02601370.2017.1274546en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to International Journal of Lifelong Educationen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectAdult educationen
dc.subjectlife-wide learningen
dc.subjectpoliticsen
dc.subjectparticipationen
dc.subjectEnglanden
dc.titleThe rise and fall of life-wide learning for adults in Englanden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Lifelong Educationen
dc.date.accepted2016-12-
rioxxterms.funderInternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW010217ATen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-07-31en
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